I have to write an essay with this argument in mind or based on this argument: "The global expansion of America's fast food industry poses a threat to the distinct cultural identity of countries...

I have to write an essay with this argument in mind or based on this argument: "The global expansion of America's fast food industry poses a threat to the distinct cultural identity of countries around the globe?"

Rhetoric analysis includes a process of identifying direct evidence and indirect evidence or strategies.

1.What are the direct strategies that Eric Schlosser uses in his book: The Fast Food Nation especially in Chapter ten on: "Global realizations"

2.What are the indirect strategies that he uses to convince his readers  and support his main argument that indeed: "The global expansion of America's fast food industry poses a threat to the distinct cultural identity of countries around the globe?"

3.Why does Schlosser choose to use those strategies? What does he achieve when he does so?

Asked on by ruthhh

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In the 1958 novel, The Ugly American, by Eugene Burdick and William Lederer, a Burmese journalist observes, "A mysterious change seems to come over Americans when they go to a foreign land. They isolate themselves socially. They live pretentiously. They're loud and ostentatious." The fast-food industry, headed by McDonald's, Eric Schlosser seems to imply, is nowadays the "Ugly American" as it positions itself in European and Asian cities with little heed to the habits and beliefs of the country in which it is positioned. Extolling the American "virtues" of convenience and immediacy, fast-food restaurants offer American food and sizing around the world, exhibiting a failure to understand local culture and imposing such ideas as "super-size" upon their European and Asian customers. 

  • Direct evidence

Schlosser points directly to the positioning of McDonalds in cosmopolitan cities of Europe, structures which undermine the architectural surroundings with the fast-food restaurant and playground, and counter the cultural tastes by promoting fatty foods loaded with salt and Americanized food and drink such as Coca-Cola and other soft drinks that are high in sugar and lead to obesity.

In order to not appear imperialistic, beef cattle are raised in the country in which the fast-food restaurant is located; however, this large-scale ranching undermines local ranching. Thus, the Americanization of other countries with the fast-food industries hits at diet, behavioral patterns, health, and cultural taste and economy. (In addition to taking away business from local restaurants, American fast-food restaurants make more profit outside the U.S. than they do inside the country.

  • Indirect evidence

A "homogenized international culture" is being generated, Schlosser argues, by the introduction of American fast-food restaurants across the globe since one of the most distinctive characteristics of a nation and its culture is its food and how and where this food is enjoyed and consumed. The Western fast-food restaurants are built in metropolitan areas where they are situated alongside other buildings. Schlosser writes that McDonald's takes its place in Dachau as it does throughout the world. Further, because the restaurants raise the cattle in the country in which they are located, it is suggested that Western methods of cattle breeding and raising may easily influence or challenge local cattle farmers.

After he exposes some of the practices of meat packing and other ills of the fast-food industry, Schlosser concludes,

Future historians, I hope, will consider the American fast food industry a relic of the twentieth century--a set of attitudes, systems, and beliefs that emerged from postwar southern California, that embodied its limitless faith in technology, that quickly spread across the globe, flourished briefly, and then receded, once its true costs became clear and its thinking became obsolete.

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ruthhh | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Hi thank you for the answer. Is this linked exactly to chapter 10:Global realization. I  have to write an essay with the argument I noted down for you based on chapter ten the last chapter in the book. What of the Mclibel, the circus and the empire of fat? Are these not direct strategies?

Why does Schlosser choose to use them? How is this going to change the way reader's think or how is it going to remove resistance? What did he anticipate from his reader's?

thank you.I hope to get answer soon as tomorrow I give in my final paper.thank you for you promt answer to the previous request.I appreciate it so much.

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