I have to write an essay on “Too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.” is she right? (Romeo and Juliet) Can anyone give me ideas about what to write?I have to write and introduction, conclusion and...

I have to write an essay on “Too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.” is she right? (Romeo and Juliet) Can anyone give me ideas about what to write?

I have to write and introduction, conclusion and 3-4 paragraphs all with topic sentences.

This extract is from Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 2, Line 117

 

Asked on by jaymie23

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ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Absolutely Juliet is correct. If she had heeded her advice, she and most probably Romeo would not have died. Don't forget that just hours before meeting Juliet, Romeo had been in love with Rosalind. In fact the friar had chided Romeo about how quickly he changed his hearts desire. It seems the old addage--if it seems too good to be true, it probably is--would apply here.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The previous posters are correct to say you must weigh the evidence and decide for yourself.  We all know their marriage was rash; what you have to decide is whether it was too rash.  For me, the answer is yes, and Romeo is my evidence.  Mere hours after pining away, literally, with love for the lost Rosaline, Romeo now loves Juliet.  It's just too rash for me. 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

First of all, remember that the entire tragedy takes place in only 3 days, so this fact indicates clearly the lovers' impetuous natures.  With this in mind, you can return to the scenes of the play and find instances of their subjugation of mental reasoning to their passions and passionate desires.  For instance, it is impetuous of Romeo to enter the Capulet Masters ball.  Once there, he abandons all thoughts of his former lover Rosalind, as he is star-struck by Juliet Capulet, and shortly afterwards he quickly declares his love for Juliet in a beautiful sonnet.  Of course, the results of this sudden passion is disastrous.  For, after their wedding  night, Romeo happens upon Tybalt in the street.  Declaring his love for Tybalt since he is in the family, Romeo wishes to ameliorate things .

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shakespeareguru | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

In a word, the events of the play suggest that Juliet is right.  Their love is moving at a fast and furious pace which builds until Romeo finds himself the murderer of Tybalt without really meaning to be, and Juliet fakes her own death rather than marry Paris as her father decrees.  The speed at which the play moves causes Romeo to believe in Juliet's death before he gets word otherwise from the Friar, and the events pick up steam until we have these two young lovers dead at each other's sides.

However, the arguing of whether she is right or not in the balcony scene at the beginning of Act II is something that you must decide for yourself.  You must create a strong thesis statement (based upon the reference to the speed of events in the play that I have mentioned above, a thesis statement might be:  Juliet predicts that the rapidity with which the love between her and Romeo has developed is a foreboding of disaster in her line, "It is too rash, too unadvis'd, too sudden," and the speed of the events that follow this scene prove her to be correct.)

However, it is certainly possible to argue that this is simply the way love goes, especially teenage love.  Teenage love can't be "too" anything because these qualities that she is describing in line 117 from Act I, scene ii are par for the course in young love, and the tragic events of the play have more to do with Fate than the impulsiveness of teenage love.  This point of view would lead to a thesis that argues that she is incorrect.

You must be the decider of what thesis you will create and then use the body of your essay to provide examples from the play that support your point of view.  Good luck!

 

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