I have to write an essay about relationship between Johnny and Ponyboy in the book The Outsiders, but I don't know what to write.I have to write an essay about relationship between Johnny and...

I have to write an essay about relationship between Johnny and Ponyboy in the book The Outsiders, but I don't know what to write.

I have to write an essay about relationship between Johnny and Ponyboy in the book The Outsiders, but I don't know what to write.

Asked on by magzilla

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cldbentley | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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While Ponyboy Curtis is the protagonist in S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders, Johnny Cade plays a crucial role.  Johnny's abuse at the hands of his parents and the Socs highlights the injustice and pain present not only in his life, but also in the lives of all of the Greasers.  Through Johnny's death, the reader is also able to see the true nature of other characters.

In the beginning of the story, Ponyboy describes Johnny Cade as "a little dark puppy that has been kicked too many times and is lost in a crowd of strangers" and adds that Johnny "was the gang's pet, everyone's kid brother." According to Ponyboy, no one cared for Johnny except the Greasers.  Clearly, Ponyboy felt responsible for Johnny and wanted to protect him.

Despite his apparent weakness, Johnny was fiercely protective of, and loyal to, Ponyboy and seemed to consider him a brother, as well.  When Bob, Randy, and the other Socs attack the two Greasers, Johnny kills Bob in order to save Ponyboy's life, as well as his own.  Later, Johnny does his best to comfort and protect Ponyboy; he allows Ponyboy to use his legs as a pillow, cuts Ponyboy's hair to alter his appearance, and saves Ponyboy's life a second time by shoving him out the window of the burning church.  Johnny sacrificed himself to save someone he loved.

All in all, I would say that Johnny and Ponyboy had a brotherly relationship and loved one another very much.  Each was willing to put himself in harm's way in order to spare the other.

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