I have a test in literature about William Bradford, and I want to know the genre and about some passages, please.

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sciftw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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William Bradford is the author of the journal "Of Plymouth Plantation."  The genre of it would best be considered a comprehensive journal.  It begins in 1608 when the pilgrims left Britain to settle in what is now the Netherlands.  The journal continues through 1620.  That narrative description is focused on the journey of the Mayflower to the New World.  Bradford continued to write through 1647 about the pilgrims themselves, their relationship with the Native Americans, and life in the New World.  

Bradford likely never intended his manuscript to be published, which is evidenced by the following quote: 

"I have been the larger in these things, and so shall crave leave in some like passages following, (though in other things I shall labour to be more contract) that their children may see with what difficulties their fathers wrestled in going through these things in their first beginnings, and how God brought them along notwithstanding all their weaknesses and infirmities. As also that some use may be made hereof in after times by others in such like weighty employments; and herewith I will end this chapter."

He did intend for it to be taken care of and read by others, but not necessarily published.  

His description of arriving in the world is a solid passage to choose. It shows the deep faith of the pilgrims and their extreme relief at having arrived at their destination.  

"Being thus arived in a good harbor and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees & blessed ye God of heaven, who had brought them over ye vast & furious ocean, and delivered them from all ye periles & miseries therof, againe to set their feete on ye firme and stable earth, their proper elemente."

Another passage is Bradford's narration of meeting Squanto and other Native Americans.  It's an important passage because it explains the terms of a treaty of sorts struck between the pilgrims and the natives.  

"All this while the Indians came skulking about them, and would sometimes show themselves aloof off, but when any approached near them, they would run away; and once they stole away their tools where they had been at work and were gone to dinner.

But about the 16th of March, a certain Indian came boldly amongst them and spoke to them in broken English, which they could well understand but marveled at it. At length they understood by discourse with him, that he was not of these parts, but belonged to the eastern parts where some English ships came to fish, with whom he was acquainted and could name sundry of them by their names, amongst whom he had got his language. He became profitable to them in acquainting them with many things concerning the state of the country in the east parts where he lived, which was afterwards profitable unto them; as also of the people here, of their names, number and strength, of their situation and distance from this place, and who was chief amongst them. His name was Samoset. He told them also of another Indian whose name was Sguanto, a native of this place, who had been in England and could speak better English than himself.

Being after some time of entertainment and gifts dismissed, a while after he came again, and five more with him, and they brought again all the tools that were stolen away before, and made way for the coming of their great Sachem, called Massasoit. Who, about four or five days after, came with the chief of his friends and other attendance, with the aforesaid Squanto. With whom, after friendly entertainment and some gifts given him, they made a peace with him (which hath now continued this 24 years) in these terms:

1.   That neither he nor any of his should injure or do hurt to any of their people.

2.   That if any of his did hurt to any of theirs, he should send the offender, that they might punish him.

3.   That if anything were taken away from any of theirs, he should cause it to be restored; and they should do the like to his.

4.  If any did unjustly war against him, they would aid him; if any did war against them, he should aid them.

5.   He should send to his neighbors confederates to certify them of this, that they might not wrong them, but might be likewise comprised in the conditions of peace.

6.   That when their men came to them, they should leave their bows and arrows behind them.

After these things he returned to his place called Sowams, some 40 miles from this place, but Squanto continued with them and was their interpreter and was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation. He directed them how to set their corn, where to take fish, and to procure other commodities, and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places for their profit, and never left them till he died.

He was a native of this place, and scarce any left alive besides himself. He we carried away with divers others by one Hunt, a master of a ship, who thought to sell them for slaves in Spain. But he got away for England and was entertained by a merchant in London, and employed to Newfoundland and other parts, and lastly brought hither into these parts by one Mr. Dermer, a gentleman employed by Sir Ferdinando Gorges and others for discovery and other designs in these parts."

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