I have a project due on The Old Man and the Sea but am confused with how to start.  Please give me some suggestions.  See below.Map out Santiago’s and your own journey.  Tell the journey you...

I have a project due on The Old Man and the Sea but am confused with how to start.  Please give me some suggestions.  See below.

  1. Map out Santiago’s and your own journey.  Tell the journey you would like to go on that is similar to Santiago’s journey.  Include obstacles you both encounter and lessons you both learn in the geographically correct locations where you learn them.  Where would you go?  In what types of situations would you learn the same lessons?  Describe those situations.  Use the geographical location’s characteristics as symbols of the lessons both you and Santiago have learned.  Provide a key, which suggests ideas, progress, symbolism, people you both meet, and allusions.

Asked on by pharris01

1 Answer | Add Yours

auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

 

Your project on The Old Man and the Sea is an intriguing one, and I understand why it might seem a little overwhelming to you.  You ask for some help getting started; by breaking it down into smaller segments, you should be able to begin working.  There are two major components to this project--Santiago's journey and your own imaginary journey.  Start with the one you know.  Santiago is on a literal journey, so make a list or draw a kind of plot line, or do whatever is going to help you visualize his actual journey.  Identify the obstacles (such as hurting his hand and the sharks) and the blessings (the tuna and the birds) and the friends (Manolin and the fish) which are part of that journey.  As you identify his journey, including all these elements, note any lessons Santiago learned from each of them.  Add any discussion of symbols and allusions (as you've probably discussed in class), plus any other ideas which come to mind.  This is the hard part, but it deals with something you've read and should know fairly well.

Now comes the easy part, though it does force you to be creative and to make some applications to the novella.  Santiago persevered through obstacles of all kinds--the sea, other animals, poverty, injury, misfortune, hunger, lack of sleep, and more.  Pick a place where you can have this same kind of journey.  Perhaps you're hiking through the mountains and get separated and lost.  Maybe you end up on a deserted island and have to survive alone.  It may be you end up trapped in a cave, stuck on the Amazon (with cannibals on either shore), or trekking through Alaska during a blizzard.  In any case, make the geographical setting the starting point, and then identify some obstacles and lessons learned as your journey progresses. 

How you decide to show these two parallel journeys is certainly up to your own creativity.  The essential visual will be the legend (key), so be sure to make yourself clear on that.  Your adventure awaits!

We’ve answered 318,911 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question