I have my speech delivery on Shakespeare's Hamlet due in the coming week. I need some help on choosing a topic to prepare a speech but I am confused. I would like my speech to be based on Hamlet's...

I have my speech delivery on Shakespeare's Hamlet due in the coming week. I need some help on choosing a topic to prepare a speech but I am confused. I would like my speech to be based on Hamlet's quotes and lessons. Example; Hamlet is somewhat violent so, the topic of my speech could be 'Revenge'. I would like you to give me some few topics for my speech where i can also put some quotes from the play of Hamlet.

 
Thanking you
Mahiro.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Shakespeare's Hamlet is his most popular play. One reason may be that Hamlet himself is a likable character. Although the play is a tragedy and he is supposed to be a melancholy and tragic figure, he is often witty and funny. What makes him especially funny is the fact that after he makes a decision to pretend to be mad, this "antic disposition" gives him an unprecedented freedom to play mind games with some of the other characters. This is seen in his meetings with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, for example, but is especially striking in his interactions with Polonius.

In Act 3, Scene 2 Hamlet asks Polonius:

"Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?"

He has the old man looking up at the sky and agreeing with him that it looks like a camel, then like a weasel, and then like a whale.

In Act 2, Scene 2 there is a comical exchange between Hamlet and Polonius which begins with:

Polonius    Do you know me, my lord?

Hamlet    Excellent well. You are a fishmonger.

There are other places in which Hamlet elicits laughter in this tragedy by making fun of Polonius. He also makes fun of Osric, and even of Claudius in Act 4, Scene 3.

Hamlet is a unique character. He is deeply troubled by his problems but is capable of seeing the comical aspects of life and humanity. It is noteworthy that even as late as Act 5, Scene 2, shortly before Hamlet is to die, he is playing mind games with Osric, the affected courtier who makes an excellent butt of Hamlet's mockery.

Sources:

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