For a creative writing piece, I need an outline for my story idea that follows narrative structure but need help because I am stuck for ideas on how to do a story idea as an outline.1)    ...

For a creative writing piece, I need an outline for my story idea that follows narrative structure but need help because I am stuck for ideas on how to do a story idea as an outline.

1)     Exposition: events that give the reader background information needed to understand the story

2)     Rising Action: major events that lead to the climax (described below)

3)     Climax: the turning point or the high point of the story

4)     Falling Action: events after the climax before the resolution

5)     Resolution: when the outcome of the story is made clear and loose ends wrapped up

Asked on by saulsarena

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Stephen Holliday | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Your instructor has given you the appropriate elements for a narrative, and if you add the details of a story in each of those categories, you'll have a story.

You might want to consider describing an serious argument you had with a good friend or family member.  The exposition section would describe what circumstances led up to the argument and, more important, what side of the argument each of you took and why.

 In the rising action section, you would describe the specific elements of the argument and how strongly or weakly each side articulated those elements--in other words, as the argument escalated, what specifically caused the escalation?  Did you and the other person try to understand each other's stance on the issue, or did each of you simply refuse to acknowledge that the other person might have some valid points.

The climax would be the high (or low) point of the argument in which you and the other person either stopped arguing out of frustration or one of you convinced the other to change an opinion. The climax will either have positive or negative results and will lead directly to the falling action.

Describing the falling action tells the reader what happened in the hours or days following the argument.  For example, did each party to the argument walk away, refusing to talk to the other?  Did you "agree to disagree"?  Did a friendship end either temporarily or permanently?

The resolution, of course, contains your reflections on the aftermath of the argument.  Were the results of this argument worth what happened?  Was a broken friendship or an altered relationship a good or necessary outcome?  A good resolution calls for some careful soul-searching about the results of this incident.

Because most of us, at one time or another, have had serious disagreements with friends or family members about something important to us, we can usually construct a narrative describing the event and its results.

Sources:

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