What is a quote by Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird that I could use in an essay about tolerance?I have quotes from other characters, but the problem is I can't find quotes that express that theme...

What is a quote by Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird that I could use in an essay about tolerance?

I have quotes from other characters, but the problem is I can't find quotes that express that theme that are said by Scout.

Asked on by stepharoo

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ddupas's profile pic

ddupas | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

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In Chapter 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird Jem and Scout have a conversation about what Jem calls “the four kinds of folks,” saying, "You know something, Scout? I've got it all figured out, now. I've thought about it a lot lately and I've got it figured out. There's four kinds of folks in the world. There's the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, there's the kind like the Cunninghams out in the woods, the kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes."  Scout responds “Naw, Jem, I think there’s just one kind of folks.  Folks.”

Harper Lee contrasts Jem’s categorization of people, something human beings do naturally as we try to understand the world around us, but that can also result in discrimination, with Scout’s innocent, pure view of human beings as just “folks".  Scout has a level of tolerance often found in the young. She does not separate people based on skin color or income level or gender.

scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Scout demonstrates tolerance best at the novel's end when she walks Boo home.  She steps on his porch and "sees" the world through his eyes, and as she does so, she thinks,

You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough. (280)

Scout is, of course, referring to Atticus's view of tolerance, but at this point in the novel, she demonstrates that she, too, will practice tolerance.  She realizes that if one is willing to try to understand someone else who is different, it doesn't take much effort (thus, her reference to simply standing rather than walking around); it just takes patience and desire.

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