I have approximately 10 weeks to complete a science experiment and I'm not sure what I want to do it on. Do you have an idea for me?The requirement is that is has to have two continuous variables...

I have approximately 10 weeks to complete a science experiment and I'm not sure what I want to do it on.

Do you have an idea for me?

The requirement is that is has to have two continuous variables and must be original in terms of the procedure and the actual idea. I have limited resources - can only use what I can find at the school lab and at home and my budjet is $20. I'm hoping to win, but every idea I've come up with are way too complicating (measure the rate of photosynthesis in different plants; try to create a substitute for enamel; test the efficiency of multitasking...) I can't do any social/pychological experiments becuase I need to have at least 100 people to participate in the experiment and that is currently not feasible for me.

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chocolatekirby007's profile pic

chocolatekirby007 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted on

I am in 10th grade and this is for Science (we don't have specific sub-subjects until 11th grade at my school). Also, for my plant experiment, I wanted to concentrate more on comparing normal plants (although water plants sound cool, I think its been done a lot, as you said). I want to do something that is relavant to issues in todays society  in the world of science (global warming, psychology of the human brain...). Thanks for the response. It sounds like you know a lot that could help me!

jessamynchiu's profile pic

jessamynchiu | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

First, I need to know what grade you are in and which specific subject this "Science Project" must be about (Biology / Chemistry / Physics). From the examples you've given me, I can see that you are probably going for a Biology experiment.

Well I think that the photosynthesis experiment would actually not be too bad (although you might lose some marks for originality and the experiment might be slightly too simple for a 10-week project). Anyways, you would select around 10 water plants of the same species, vary the light intensity (by moving a lamp around), then count the number of bubbles produced (photosynthesis rate), or use a gas syringe (though this setup would be slightly more complicated).

I was thinking that maybe a chemistry investigation would be easier if you have regular access to the school lab. You could perhaps try electroplating a copper coin and see if the rate is proportional to the size of the coin, but again that might be a little too complicated. If it is, you could simply electroplate different coins and find the difference in rate.

Again, the Physics option is also open, though you might need more complicated apparatus like data loggers etc. if you want to investigate motion.

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