Has Mayella exchanged the word ''is'' for the word ''does" when she says her father ''does tollable'' in Chapter 18 of To Kill a Mockingbird?It seems nowhere on the Internet can tell you what that...

Has Mayella exchanged the word ''is'' for the word ''does" when she says her father ''does tollable'' in Chapter 18 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

It seems nowhere on the Internet can tell you what that means or who has ever said that. I felt silly on the Internet for hours.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The supposed rape victim in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, Mayella Ewell is poorly educated and practically illiterate, like her father and siblings. When Atticus asks her how long she had attended school, Mayella tells him "two year--three year--dunno." Many of Lee's characters use Southern, colloquial speech--even the well-educated Atticus--but the Ewells' speech patterns are more sub-standard than the others'. When Atticus asks Mayella if her father is "good to you, is he easy to get along with," she responds, "He does tollable." What Mayella really means is that "he is tolerable." The author substitutes "does tollable" to simply illustrate Mayella's poor upbringing and lack of schooling, creating a bit of sympathy for the woman who falsely accused Tom Robinson of rape.

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