In "Harrison Bergeron," were they successful in creating an equal society?

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In my opinion, they were not successful in creating an equal society in Kurt Vonnegut's short story, "Harrison Bergeron." In an effort to create an equal society, they destroyed a functioning one. 

The opening paragraph lets the reader know the purpose of the society that's been created...

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In my opinion, they were not successful in creating an equal society in Kurt Vonnegut's short story, "Harrison Bergeron." In an effort to create an equal society, they destroyed a functioning one. 

The opening paragraph lets the reader know the purpose of the society that's been created in the year 2081. 

The year was 2081, and everyone was finally equal. They weren't only equal before God and the law, they were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anyone else. Nobody was better looking than anyone else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of the agents of the United States Handicapper General.

Although the Handicapper General's office met the definition of "equal" by handicapping everyone so everyone was equal in physical and mental qualities, the very equality which they sought to achieve caused the functioning society to cease to exist. Equal is defined by Merriam-Webster as "A person or thing considered to be the same as another in status or quality." By using radio alarms to send out sharp signals, people with above-average intelligence weren't allowed to use their intelligence to its full capacity. Graceful dancers were burdened with weights to inhibit their abilities. Beautiful people had to wear masks so they wouldn't stand out.  

The problem is that no one is allowed to contribute their gifts to society, which is what is required in order to have a well-functioning society that meets the needs of its citizens. The Handicapper General, Diana Moon Glampers, focused on handicapping those who have abilities that might make other, more average people, feel badly about themselves. This led to the entire unraveling of society, in which nothing is particularly excellent, inspiring, or meaningful. Hazel and George are examples of this unraveling. They watch television, but do not find enjoyment in it. They don't seem to contribute to the world around them in any way. George is constantly burdened by the radio signals interrupting his thoughts. He also wears a forty-seven-pound bag of birdshot around his neck as a burden meant to equalize him with everyone else.  

Hazel and George have a conversation about the handicapping where they decide if they didn't have it, society would go back to the "dark ages" with everyone competing with everyone else. They say they would both hate that, but then their thoughts are interrupted again. They can't have a normal conversation. The society may have equality in ability, but they have sacrificed inspiration, meaningful relationships, and the unique contributions of its members as a result. They are no longer even capable of processing emotions. 

Hazel and George's son, Harrison Bergeron, is seven feet tall and gorgeous. He is the strongest and most intelligent, and wears three hundred pounds of handicaps as a result. He decides to throw these away and express his unique abilities. He calls himself the Emperor and chooses an Empress. He and the ballerina dance extraordinarily. Diana Moon Glampers shoots them both, as Hazel and George watch the scene unfold on television. They both state that they are sad, but can't process why. The death of their own son doesn't even penetrate the handicapping and resultant dullness.

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