Hard to Keep a Straight Face . . .I love to share funny stories where as a teacher one can barely contain the laughter from a comment made by a student during a discussion or lecture. I just had a...

Hard to Keep a Straight Face . . .

I love to share funny stories where as a teacher one can barely contain the laughter from a comment made by a student during a discussion or lecture. I just had a whopper last year and I actually have no idea how I maintained any composure.

We were reading Harrison Bergeron and we kind of got off on a tangent about who writes the Amendments to the Constitution (in reference to the "213th Amendment"to the constitution in the story). I asked the class who they thought wrote the Amendments and one know-it-all girl in my class was looking around at the rest of the students like they were idiots for not knowing. She was shaking her head and let out this exasperated sigh. So I asked her, "_________ you look like you know who wrote the Amendments," to which she replies matter-of-factly, "Duh! It was God!" Obviously she was getting Amendments confused with Commandments and I almost died- even more so because I think I was the only one who understood the blunder.

Asked on by clane

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

While teaching Julius Caesar I really thought that all my students were on board and getting the main points, if not the finer details.  On my "explain the significance of the quote" test I put Brutus's famous line, "It is not that I loved Caesar less, it is that I loved Rome more."    Imagine my horror, when a student came up and asked "Who's Rome?"

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I do find myself laughing out loud at times at bloopers students have made in written work because of spell checks - one essay based on The Motorcycle Diaries changed "lepers" to Ernesto working in a "leopard colony" and another essay based on Victorian discipline in school talked about how teachers were used to "canning" children when they were naughty.

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clane | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Love it Amy! :) Quick recovery. I don't think my students would have let one like that go. I usually have to go back through papers that I've graded while tired or otherwise to make sure I didn't write what I was really thinking. :)

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

My first year teaching, I had the 11th grade American Lit gifted kids.  As I was grading essays one evening, I had a glass or two of wine as I was reading.  On one essay I wrote in the margin "BS" without thinking and handed back the papers the next day.  The young man whose paper I had written these two bold letters on thought he had caught me in an inpardonable error.  When he asked me loudly in front of the entire class what "BS" meant (smiling like Satan himself, I might add), I looked at him and the rest of them, and very casually delivered, "Bad Sentence.  What did you think?"  We had a great laugh, although, until today I have never made this admission so public.  As far as I know, they bought it...at least at the surface level. :)

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I was just thinking about something else funny, about the same kid from #4 above.

This boy played Don John in our "Much Ado" last summer. He was AMAZING! Such a great actor, hard worker, etc. Well, I heard that he wasn't going to be in "Shrew" this summer. I asked him, and he said he wasn't sure...might be working.... So I just said, "Well, whatever you decide is fine, but you were so good, I'd really like to see you do it again."

Last week I had a meeting and I provided donuts. After the meeting, there were 2 donuts left, so I went down the hall because I had heard this student's voice. He was with another boy, so I said, "Hey, you have a minute?" They said sure and came down to my classroom. They got there and I said, "I have these leftover donuts that I don't know what to do with." They both looked at me like, "IT'S CHRISTMAS - YAY!" But as they're reaching for the donuts, I said, "Wait...are you both planning to be in the play next summer?" His friend said, "Oh, yeah, I definitely want to do it."

The one I was entrapping says, "I have to be in the play to get the donut?" I said, "Yes." He picks up the donut, says, "Yeah, I'll do it," and walks out, telling everyone in the hallway that he just "sold his soul" for a donut.

I shouted out my door, "Wait! That implies that I'm Satan!" To which he responds, "YEP!" :)

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I love this topic. I had a 7th grader ask me very seriously if spelling counted on a spelling test. Another time, and I can't remember what we were doing so that this question would be asked, an 8th grade boy asked me if there was such a thing as a wind bra. I think he was thinking of the things that protect cars from bugs. I couldn't resist. I said, "No, our boobies don't usually sway in the wind, so we don't need a wind bra."

GOOD GRIEF!!!!!  That is hysterical!!!!  Again, LOL here!!! :)

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malibrarian | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

YES! Teachers that can laugh at themselves! :) LOL here, amethystrose!!!

Last year in Brit Lit, when the kids were reading "Ivanhoe," I was explaining the differences between the Normans and the Saxons, going through the whole history of the period so they understood (reminding them of the Disney "Robin Hood" to pique their interests a bit),making sure they knew that the royalty was Norman, etc., and I started naming names..."Okay, is Cedric a Norman or a Saxon?" Most of the kids said "Saxon." "Okay, is King Richard a N or S?" Some said, "Norman," some said "Saxon," so I explained again about the Plantagenets, the Normans, etc., etc.  I go through a couple of more names to see...yup, they're all getting it.  So then I say, "What about Prince John?"  This one kid raises his hand, goes "OOO!! OOO!!!  I KNOW THIS ONE, MRS. BOGUT!!!!!"  I say, "Okay, _________, go for it!"

"HE'S A SAXON!!!!!!!!"

The entire class burst out laughing, and I had to bite the insides of my cheeks not to join in...Fortunately, this kid has the ego and confidence of a man probably 20 years older, so he wasn't upset that everyone laughed at him...In fact, I still rib him a bit about it every now and then.

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Susan Woodward | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

I was teaching Julius Caesar to my 10th graders, and I was trying to translate scenes into words they could understand.  Of course, there's something to be learned about usage, whether it's standard English or "street" English.  We were discussing Caesar's monologue just before he is assassinated in Act III, and I was commenting on the dramatic irony of his words about being "as constant at the Northern Star".  I tried to put it in words I'd heard the kids use, so I went on to say how the speech was ironic because Caesar didn't know that he was about to be whacked off any second.  Half of the boys fell on the floor laughing!  One of them finally took me aside to explain the difference between "whacked" and "whacked off"... my face still burns!

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I love this topic. I had a 7th grader ask me very seriously if spelling counted on a spelling test. Another time, and I can't remember what we were doing so that this question would be asked, an 8th grade boy asked me if there was such a thing as a wind bra. I think he was thinking of the things that protect cars from bugs. I couldn't resist. I said, "No, our boobies don't usually sway in the wind, so we don't need a wind bra."

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