In Hamlet, identify 10 lines that have a secondary, non-literal meaning behind them. Provide a translation for each in modern day English.For each, identify the act, scene, and line. Example:...

In Hamlet, identify 10 lines that have a secondary, non-literal meaning behind them. Provide a translation for each in modern day English.

For each, identify the act, scene, and line.

Example: Claudius:" are you like the painting of a sorrow, a face withought a heart?" (4.7.118-119)

Translation: Are you truly upset or just appearing to be upset?

Expert Answers
akasha124 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I shall the effect of this good lesson keep,
As watchman to my heart. But, good my brother,
Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven;
Whiles, like a puff'd and reckless libertine,
Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
And recks not his own rede.

Ophelia, scene 1.3.47-51

 O, fear me not. 
 I stay too long: but here my father comes. 

A double blessing is a double grace

Laertes, 1.3.51-53

Using what would be considered common parlance popularized in hip hop and rap, which could be argued to be similar to some of the language Shakespeare used to appeal the commoners attending his plays:

OPHELIA:

I hear what you're tryin' to tell me
I can mind my own heart. But, holier than thou bro,
Don't be tryin to front like you is some preacherman.
Tellin' me running the streets and doin what I do is wrong
While you acting like some kind of G
Runnin' around and sellin rock yo'self
You ain't even listening to yo'self.

LAERTES:
Oh, I'm just talkin'
I gotta go, here comes Pops
Keep it real