Hamlet can we consider Hamlet morals  or the morality of Hamlet character as  tragic-flaw ?

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ask996 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Perhaps we should consider Hamlet’s unwillingness to consider alternative means of getting revenge as his tragic flaw. He could have killed Claudius, and that’s the course he ended up taking, but he could also have revealed Claudius to the court. He could have revealed Claudius to Gertrude earlier in the play. He could also have forgiven. Any of those things would have fit better with his “morals”.

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mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Inaction seems a flaw that is, indeed, tragic.  For, it is Hamlet's indecisiveness and procrastination that allow Claudius the time to devise a plan to rid himself of Hamlet by enlisting Laertes in his deadly plot

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kapokkid eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I like what the earlier poster said about the fact that Hamlet's inaction and difficulty in actually making decisions makes it hard to determine or declare that he is moral or immoral.  He spends a great deal of time contemplating the moral implications of a variety of things, the ghost's speech, his relationship with Ophelia, his mother's marriage to his uncle, his opportunity to kill Claudius while he prays, his own desire to kill himself, etc.  He examines these moral decisions in great detail and with great spirit, but often lacks the ability to make any sort of a decision.

Perhaps you could say that he has a moral mind and a moral heart, but it is difficult for him to make moral decisions about which action to take.

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Doug Stuva eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I would suggest Hamlet's concern for his own life is nonexistent.  He is suffering from melancholy (depression) and is suicidal at times.  I don't think he delays because he's worried about his own life.  He wonders if the ghost is really the ghost of his father or a demon leading him toward destruction (as the witches do in Macbeth , for example); he needs solid proof of the new king's guilt; he "plays God" and doesn't want to send Claudius to heaven by killing him while he's at prayer.  These issues contribute to...

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epollock | Student

If you look at the Aristotelian definition, then he clearly is a tragic figure. But to pigeon hole a character which does not allow some type of leeway prevents one from understanding the character in many other ways.

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sercret | Student

. Hamlet is very popular of people of Denmark . He can take this situation in his advantage but he does not, because he is a  noble which means if he has to take a passive acceptance immediately and forget about the revenge .

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