What is the difference between compound, mixture and element?

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An element consists of exactly same atoms, that is, no atom can be distinguished from the other. This means that an element cannot be further divided and hence is a pure form of matter. An example of an element is oxygen. Two or more elements combine in a fixed ratio...

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An element consists of exactly same atoms, that is, no atom can be distinguished from the other. This means that an element cannot be further divided and hence is a pure form of matter. An example of an element is oxygen. Two or more elements combine in a fixed ratio to form a compound. Hence, a compound has atoms of two or more different types and hence can be divided into individual fragments or other proportions. An example of a compound is water, which has hydrogen and oxygen in a 2:1 ratio. All the individual constituents of a compound lose out on their individual properties and hence a compound can have properties that are different from that of its constituents. A mixture is made up of two or more elements in any ratio. However, the difference between a mixture and compound is that the constituents can be easily differentiated in case of a mixture. An example is trail mix, from which we can pick out raisins, nuts, etc. easily. The individual components of a mixture retain their individual properties (for examples, raisins will still taste the same when in trail mix, etc.).

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