Is Guantanamo Bay similar to The Ministry of Love in 1984?What are the similarities and differences between the Ministry of Love in '1984' and the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.For the last...

Is Guantanamo Bay similar to The Ministry of Love in 1984?

What are the similarities and differences between the Ministry of Love in '1984' and the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

For the last six years, The United States government has been torturing people (waterboarding) who have been jailed without trial in a detention centre which is disconnected from the legal system. Many of these people have committed no crime.

Is this similar to Walter Smith's experiences in The Ministry of Love? Is the detention centre at Guantanamo Bay the action of a totalitarian state? Why didn't American democracy make it impossible for Guantanamo to happen?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guant%C3%A1namo_Bay_detention_camp

Asked on by frizzyperm

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enotechris's profile pic

enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

It's an exact parallel.  I suggest to #2 to reread 1984 with current US headlines in mind, and my full post below.   Amendments 4 through 8 of the US Constitution have been gutted by this present administration.  That some foreign places may allow such practices is horrible enough; That the the US outsources torture and condones such practices makes us hypocrites as well. How long will it be before the government practices it on US soil? So long, Amendment 8: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted."

Why hasn't American democracy made it impossible for Guantanamo to happen? Maybe because the media didn't hear all the protesters sequestered in their "Free Speech" Zone.  Or maybe the goverment forbid such protests.

If we're not living in a totalitarian state yet, we're well on our way.  

See full discussion on another post:  

http://www.enotes.com/soc/group/discuss/12661?replyTo=30531

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