Griffin reports a rise in suicide among the black Southern community. He clarifies that this does not mean that these men and women were killing themselves but that they no longer cared whether they lived or died. How do you suppose he thinks his experiment will help this problem?

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In Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin , a white man, undergoes skin treatments so that he appears black. He travels around the segregated South in the late 1950s and early 1960s and writes about what it's like to be black in the South. He senses in a more...

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In Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin, a white man, undergoes skin treatments so that he appears black. He travels around the segregated South in the late 1950s and early 1960s and writes about what it's like to be black in the South. He senses in a more direct way how blacks are humiliated on a daily basis. For example, he can't find a bathroom that is accessible to black people in segregated cities, and he begins to understand what it is like to be treated as less than human.

He expects his experiment to help black people by letting the black community know that at least some white people are sympathetic to their plight and to the discrimination and humiliation that they suffer on a daily level. In addition, his experiment exposes how ludicrous discrimination is because whites are fooled by his dying his skin a darker color. Some whites at that time believed that race was more than skin deep. By carrying out this experiment, Griffin exposes the superficiality, irrationality, and idiocy of racial segregation. Therefore, his work was a way to reach out to the black community and to the white community to try to form a bridge of understanding between them.

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