The Greek Era How important were religion and politics in the greek era, depending on Antigone the play?

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Hegel, who wrote a very famous analysis of Antigonein his book Phenomenology of Spirit, argued that the play revolved around a clash of two different political ideals: the tradition-bound ideal of Antigone, and that of Creon , which is essentially based on power and might. In this...

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Hegel, who wrote a very famous analysis of Antigone in his book Phenomenology of Spirit, argued that the play revolved around a clash of two different political ideals: the tradition-bound ideal of Antigone, and that of Creon, which is essentially based on power and might. In this reading, the fundamental conflict of the play, the burial of Antigone's brother, is at heart a political issue. I've attached a link to the book below, though it is pretty tough going. There are also plenty of analyses of the topic in the eNotes study guide for Antigone.

http://books.google.com/books?id=xOnhG9tidGsC&printsec=frontcover&dq=hegel+phenomenology+of+spirit&hl=en&sa=X&ei=hQ9YT_OMMo6Jtwez-fGEDw&sqi=2&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=antigone&f=false

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One thing that stands out for me is the importance of burying the dead in the Greek religion.  Antigone risks everything to bury her brother, and obviously not allowing him to be buried was a terrible punishment.  They felt that his spirit would not be able to rest for eternity.

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