In The Great Gatsby, how does Myrtle react when she is in New York?

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Myrtle’s transformation begins on the train, where she changes into a tight flowered dress. At the station, she buys magazines about superficial subjects such as gossip and movies. Just in catching a cab, she lets four cars go by before she chooses the newest, most luxurious one she sees. She...

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Myrtle’s transformation begins on the train, where she changes into a tight flowered dress. At the station, she buys magazines about superficial subjects such as gossip and movies. Just in catching a cab, she lets four cars go by before she chooses the newest, most luxurious one she sees. She also petulantly insists that Tom buy her a puppy.

While at the apartment, although she complains to the other female guests about her husband, she also enjoys drinking the amply available illegal whiskey. Her sister tells Nick some of the fantasies Myrtle has shared with her, such as that Tom cannot get a divorce because Daisy is Catholic; she also claims that Tom is Myrtle’s “first sweetie” since getting married. Myrtle tells a story about meeting Tom and deciding to get involved with him because “you can’t live forever.”

Unfortunately, with the alcohol, Myrtle’s good judgment seems to abandon her, and she begins taunting Tom by mentioning his wife’s name. This episode is central because Tom’s true character is revealed: he strikes Myrtle with his hand, and breaks her nose. She then becomes a “despairing figure on the couch, bleeding fluently . . .”

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Myrtle acts very differently when she in New York. She enjoys spending Tom's money, as we see when she asks for a puppy and when she stops to buy a magazine, some "cold cream" and perfume. Moreover, she boasts about the high cost of hiring a woman to come to the apartment to look at her feet.

Myrtle also likes to portray herself in a more glamorous light. One her arrival in New York, for instance, she changes into a "cream-colored chiffon" dress and is described by Nick as sweeping around the room when she moves.

Finally, Myrtle develops an inflates sense of self-importance: she moves as though she has a "dozen chefs" waiting her in the kitchen and claims that she has to keep on at "people" all the time, like the ice boy.

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