Is Granny Weatherall Worth Reading?this is a story of a 80 year old lady laying in bed gettin grogggy and dying i cant see why should should interest anybody? how would you answer this?

4 Answers | Add Yours

mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

If you read everything in terms of being entertained, you might consider this idea. There are other reasons to read other than personal enjoyment, although it is always great to enjoy personally what we are reading and to identify with it. That said, however, think of this. Sometimes we read to study and learn, rather than to simply sit back and be entertained.

From a literary perspective, you can read this story as an example of stream of consciousness writing, a different style of writing than you are probably used to encountering. So, what is stream of consciousness? How does it work? What does it accomplish? Who else wrote in this style?

Your response may be, so what? Why should I care? To this I would respond, "Have you ever seen the movie, Animal House?" Huh? What does this crazy John Belushi movie have to do with this story? When the movie opens, we see the motto of Faber College--"Knowledge is good." This is funny because it seems like such a "Duh!" motto for a college! But it's true. Knowledge is good! It's better to know than to not know! If you understand "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," that will give you an edge over everybody who does not understand that story. In other words, you will know more than they do; you will also know more than you used to know. Knowledge is good!

Also, think of it this way. Every story answers at least one good question that is most usually interesting. For most people, this is an interesting question: "What is it like to die?" Reading the story will give you one answer to that question as the writer imagines it. 

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go crazy, to lose your mind? If this sounds like an interesting question, read "Silent Snow, Secret Snow" by Conrad Aiken. Whatever you do, keep reading!

 

 

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I have read many things in my life both before and after becoming an English teacher that I can't say thrill me.  Much of early American Literature is a cure of insomnia in my opinion; however, these pieces of literature are important for each American to read in order to get a sense of the country he/she is living in and how it came to be the country we know today.  There is always a lesson to be learned, and I am a firm believer that every reading is a conversation with the author.  You must plug yourself in or you don't get what's being said and you miss out on a lot. I mean, when Bart Simpson makes a reference to Hamlet or The Raven, don't you want to be able to get the joke?

That being said, every time we read a piece of literature, we come out on the other side changed in some way.  Everything makes us think about our place in the world and how we would have behaved in the same situation, or if we believe the story or not...it helps mold us into the people we are meant to be.  Approach each assignment from that vantage point, and you can't help but smile a little.  What does Granny have in store for you?

Excellent answer. And don't you find yourself understanding and maybe appreciating literature a little bit more the older you get?

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I have read many things in my life both before and after becoming an English teacher that I can't say thrill me.  Much of early American Literature is a cure of insomnia in my opinion; however, these pieces of literature are important for each American to read in order to get a sense of the country he/she is living in and how it came to be the country we know today.  There is always a lesson to be learned, and I am a firm believer that every reading is a conversation with the author.  You must plug yourself in or you don't get what's being said and you miss out on a lot. I mean, when Bart Simpson makes a reference to Hamlet or The Raven, don't you want to be able to get the joke?

That being said, every time we read a piece of literature, we come out on the other side changed in some way.  Everything makes us think about our place in the world and how we would have behaved in the same situation, or if we believe the story or not...it helps mold us into the people we are meant to be.  Approach each assignment from that vantage point, and you can't help but smile a little.  What does Granny have in store for you?

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

My answer is that sometimes we have to read something that isn't particularly interesting to us but that someone else has decided is important for our development as well-educated people. This story might not appeal to you, but many other people consider it an important piece of American literature. That's why it is a part of many high schools' curricula.

Just grit your teeth and bear it. Remember, that which doesn't kill us makes us stronger. :)

We’ve answered 318,935 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question