Grading rubricsI'm new to yearbook production and need some pointers on how and what to grade. What are your expectations for ad sales? How do you hold staff accountable for ad sales? How do you...

Grading rubrics

I'm new to yearbook production and need some pointers on how and what to grade. What are your expectations for ad sales? How do you hold staff accountable for ad sales? How do you grade page design? Do you grade strictly on meeting deadlines, or do you have rubrics?

I'd love to hear from other yearbook advisers.

Asked on by linda-allen

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lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I like the way poster #5 has set up her classroom and grading guidelines. I have never taught yearbook but my observations have been that the adviser and one or two students generally end up carrying the load for everyone else.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

We used Taylor last year. I really liked our rep., but he kept vital information to himself: such as the price he quoted was not the price we ended up paying for the finished yearbook. He quoted me $26,000 and we ended up paying $31,000. I knew that all the namestamps and icons would add to the final cost, but not $5,000! This year we're with Walsworth, and I'm very pleased. Their page design is much better than Taylor's EliteVision. Last year we had 64 color pages in our 192-page book. This year our entire yearbook is color, and it will cost us about $12,000 less than last year.

With slow ad sales, I don't know what we'd do if we had stayed with Taylor.

It sounds like you sell parent tributes for all class levels. We do that only for seniors, and our prices are about the same as yours.

engtchr5's profile pic

engtchr5 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

How funny. I was just thinking that somebody really needed to create a yearbook group and, ta-da! Here it is.

This is my first year of doing yearbook as well, and I'm finding it very challenging. We use the Taylor company for our book production, and so far, their curriculum has been of little to no use in the classroom. True, it shows kids how to do things that are yearbook-related, but there are few activities that are truly engaging.

Thus far, I've treated yearbook like a "workshop" period. Kids go around campus, take pictures, fill in the yearbook website, and do writing projects related to advertising and copywriting. Even so, yearbook class is not my finest hour as a teacher. I still feel as though I'm just blindly fumbling my way through the process.

So far as ad sales go, I've employed our class advisors (Sr., Jr., etc.) to send out a universal email to all the parents advertising the idea that they need to buy their students yearbook ads to congratulate them. Our price structure is $80 for 1/4 page, $120 for 1/2 page, and $200 for a full page. Needless to say, we're encouraging parents to go with the full-page option. Local businesses will also advertise, but with the group I have this year, I hesitate to step out into the community with them for fear of how they will behave in the presence of business owners. Hopefully they'll delegate this to someone else next year. It seems like they switch off on about a yearly basis, and frankly, that's never enough time for anyone to become truly familiar with the process.

formeradviser's profile pic

formeradviser | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

How funny. I was just thinking that somebody really needed to create a yearbook group and, ta-da! Here it is.

This is my first year of doing yearbook as well, and I'm finding it very challenging. We use the Taylor company for our book production, and so far, their curriculum has been of little to no use in the classroom. True, it shows kids how to do things that are yearbook-related, but there are few activities that are truly engaging.

Thus far, I've treated yearbook like a "workshop" period. Kids go around campus, take pictures, fill in the yearbook website, and do writing projects related to advertising and copywriting. Even so, yearbook class is not my finest hour as a teacher. I still feel as though I'm just blindly fumbling my way through the process.

So far as ad sales go, I've employed our class advisors (Sr., Jr., etc.) to send out a universal email to all the parents advertising the idea that they need to buy their students yearbook ads to congratulate them. Our price structure is $80 for 1/4 page, $120 for 1/2 page, and $200 for a full page. Needless to say, we're encouraging parents to go with the full-page option. Local businesses will also advertise, but with the group I have this year, I hesitate to step out into the community with them for fear of how they will behave in the presence of business owners. Hopefully they'll delegate this to someone else next year. It seems like they switch off on about a yearly basis, and frankly, that's never enough time for anyone to become truly familiar with the process.

  engtchr5, if you're doing the yearbook for the 2009-2010 school year, I'd suggest that you get to a company sponsored workshop or to the JEA convention in Washington, DC, in November.  To start with, you're not charging nearly enough for your ads.  Take the total cost of your book, divide it by the number of pages in your book and multiply that answer by three to price your full page ad.  That's the rule of thumb for pricing in the yearbook industry today.  As for selling the ads, it's to your advantage to sell the smaller ads.  With your current pricing 4 quarter pages ads net you $320 while a full page ad only gets you $200.  As for your kids, have your rep or some other sales resource train your students how to sell ads.  Let them practice in front of a video camera in your class, dress them up and send them on their way.  They'll do fine. 

thompsonk325's profile pic

thompsonk325 | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I have been a yearbook adviser for three years and I struggled for a long time to find a way to grade my students since everyone is always doing something different.  I developed a bi-weekly grading system where each student sets goals for themselves.  (Example of goals: 1. I will obtain, scan, and upload the basketball team picture. Then I will post it to my page and fill in the names of the players.  2. I will contact five businesses with ad sales information  3.  I will complete three interviews for the story on the basketball page.) If a student can not think of three things, they do not have enough to do and need to add more to their workload. We also have additional weekly goals like cleaning out the picture folders and maintaining and charging the camera.

At the start of the bi-week period, we go over each of the goals. Halfway through, I asses their progress, and then on grade day we review and conference about their goals.  They receive a score from 0-10 based on their performance.

It isn't always perfect, but it works for me.  Final page spreads are edited as a group. I give points on these group edit days and it is entirely based on my observations.  

laescuela's profile pic

laescuela | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I am new to yearbook as well, but I teach middle school. We are using RememebrMe Online as our publisher. Their pricing is reasonable for paper back which is what we are doing, but they also do hardbound which is what high schools do.

I am interested in grading rubrics.Any ideas?

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