Grading rubrics I'm new to yearbook production and need some pointers on how and what to grade. What are your expectations for ad sales? How do you hold staff accountable for ad sales? How do you grade page design? Do you grade strictly on meeting deadlines, or do you have rubrics? I'd love to hear from other yearbook advisers.

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I like the way poster #5 has set up her classroom and grading guidelines. I have never taught yearbook but my observations have been that the adviser and one or two students generally end up carrying the load for everyone else.

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We used Taylor last year. I really liked our rep., but he kept vital information to himself: such as the price he quoted was not the price we ended up paying for the finished yearbook. He quoted me $26,000 and we ended up paying $31,000. I knew that all the namestamps and icons would add to the final cost, but not $5,000! This year we're with Walsworth, and I'm very pleased. Their page design is much better than Taylor's EliteVision. Last year we had 64 color pages in our 192-page book. This year our entire yearbook is color, and it will cost us about $12,000 less than last year.

With slow ad sales, I don't know what we'd do if we had stayed with Taylor.

It sounds like you sell parent tributes for all class levels. We do that only for seniors, and our prices are about the same as yours.

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How funny. I was just thinking that somebody really needed to create a yearbook group and, ta-da! Here it is.

This is my first year of doing yearbook as well, and I'm finding it very challenging. We use the Taylor company for our book production, and so far, their curriculum has been of little to no use in the classroom. True, it shows kids how to do things that are yearbook-related, but there are few activities that are truly engaging.

Thus far, I've treated yearbook like a "workshop" period. Kids go around campus, take pictures, fill in the yearbook website, and do writing projects related to advertising and copywriting. Even so, yearbook class is not my finest hour as a teacher. I still feel as though I'm just blindly fumbling my way through the process.

So far as ad sales go, I've employed our class advisors (Sr., Jr., etc.) to send out a universal email to all the parents advertising the idea that they need to buy their students yearbook ads to congratulate them. Our price structure is $80 for 1/4 page, $120 for 1/2 page, and $200 for a full page. Needless to say, we're encouraging parents to go with the full-page option. Local businesses will also advertise, but with the group I have this year, I hesitate to step out into the community with them for fear of how they will behave in the presence of business owners. Hopefully they'll delegate this to someone else next year. It seems like they switch off on about a yearly basis, and frankly, that's never enough time for anyone to become truly familiar with the process.

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