Can someone please help me to analyze "God's Love" by Elizabeth Cushing Taylor? Thank you in advance.

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wordprof | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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First, the mechanics: there are three quatrains in ABAB rhyme scheme, sort of.  The A rhymes are near-rhymes, with either the vowel sounds repeated (love-us) or the consonant sounds repeated (wind-bend) but not both, except (see-see), which is a simple repetition and therefore not a true rhyme. The B-lines are true rhymes (sigh-by, here-near, know-go). The lines are iambic tetrameter (unstressed-stressed iambic feet) and there are four feet per line.

As for content, the poem borders on doggerel, making trite comparisons and dealing with an old, childish sentiment dealt with more simply years ago. It has no new insight, nor new vocabulary or word combination. It does not break new ground, and it does not contribute anything to its type. It is what is often called “greeting-card poetry,” on the level of “This little poem comes to say/ Sure hope you have a happy day.”  This is not a criticism, merely an analysis based on previous poetry, such as Wordsworth's or Shelley's.

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