Given that Romeo and Juliet "fell in love" or became attracted to each other so quickly...were they truly genuinely in love?? So if they didn't die (and perhaps if they have been able to runaway together or something), do you think their love/relationship would have lasted?? Explain your reasoning. Thanks.

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This depends so much on your idea of what true love is and what infatuation is.  Where is the line anyway?

I guess if I had to choose I would say it is infatuation.  In Act I, Scene 5, Romeo falls in love with Juliet just by seeing her.  He has never even spoken to her and yet he is in love.  What could that be but infatuation based on her looks?

You can also argue that he is just infatuated because he can't wait to find some way to marry her legitimately.  Instead, he marries her in secret, hurriedly, and that leads to both of them dying.

So his love seems immature.  And I guess you could say, therefore, that it is just infatuation.

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It is difficult to answer that question categorically. They are certainly infatuated with each other, as the imagery of their speech would testify. Romeo, for example, eschews conventional religious references in his praise for Juliet's beauty preferring to compare her to the stars and moon in the sky above them (Act 2, scene 2). Romantic? Most certainly. Lasting? possibly, but this is a peripheral issue in my opinion.

Classical tragedy (in the Aristotelean sense) centres on the tragic flaw (hamartia) of the main protagonist - the hero. In R&J, we are presented with two main protagonists, a 'pair of star cross'd lovers' who are fated to die for their love (see Prologue). Their flaw, which to a large degree they share, is that they love "not wisely, but too well" to steal from Othello. Classical tragedy also requires the hero to die, after a period of pathos and catharsis in the audience, who forgive him for his fault. In R&J, the audience certainly pities the lovers, but also bemoans the impetuous nature of their love. It is necessary that they die to maintain the integrity of the tragic plot, in other words.

We are presented with an all consuming passion, that burns both characters up; they cannot survive whilst they are apart. And because of the history of bad blood and emnity between the families, they cannot make their love known for fear of reprisal from parties within their families; Tybalt, for one, hates peace.

The secrecy and urgency of their relationship is a reflection of both the intensity of their feelings for each other, but also of their youth, and it may be this consideration that would persuade most people to suggest that it might not last.

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Lust, yes. Love? Romeo, and arguably Juliet as well, can't tell the difference. The only real difference between his infatuation with Juliet and his infatuation with Rosaline is that with Juliet it is requited. Recall how he said he made it into Juliet's courtyard? Love's light wings helped him leap over the wall, and he says in return he lent Love eyes. Love must refer to Cupid, then, and that guy is all about lust.
Juliet does often say the right things; however, her actions are not always consistent with what she says. For instance, before she goes to the party she tells her mother that she will look at Paris (if look to liking move) but will only look with eyes that her mother would permit. When she meets Romeo, she seems to forget that she even has parents. She and Romeo are heavily into their "relationship" before they even know each other's names. One might argue that they recognize true love immediately; however, they haven't actually talked to each other about anything other than their flirtation.Everything about their "love" is impulsive and sudden. Yes, Juliet knows better, but almost as quickly as she voices concern, she acts in accordance with her impulse. Neither acts in one another's best interest, and neither seems genuinely concerned with the other's well being.

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That is tough to say. I lean towards no. At the beginning of the play, Romeo is deeply in love with Rosalind. All it took for Romeo to forget her was seeing Juliet. What is stop him from looking at another young lady that will pay attention to him and feel the same way?

Juliet does have some major reservations about their love as well. In the balcony scene, she is worried about Romeo's commitment to her. She's the more leveled headed out of the two so for her to say something like that is significant.

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