Give instances which prove that Anne had a good sense of humour.

1 Answer | Add Yours

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In being a teenager, humor is part of Anne's way in dealing with the world.  Frank is able to use humor as a means of displaying insight into the world around her.  The use of sarcasm as humor is part of this process, something that Frank is able to display on both personal and political levels.  

One such example of Frank's humor resides in the introspection regarding her sister.  Anne is able to display humor in showing how Margot is perceived the "ideal," something that Anne is perceived not to be:  "Mother’s reading Gentlemen, Wives and Servants, and of course I’m not allowed to read it (though Margot is!). First I have to be more intellectually developed, like my genius of a sister."  The use of teen sarcasm is evident in this statement. Through it, humor illuminates feelings about Anne and her place in the world.  Another instance of this sarcasm is seen with ‘‘Margot doesn't need it [the Van Daans's parenting advice], since she's naturally good, kind and clever, perfection itself."  In both of these instances, sarcastic humor is employed as a way of assessing the world around her.

Frank's humor extends to the political realm, as well.  Frank uses humor as a form of resistance against the crimes the Nazis are perpetrating:   ‘‘Fine specimens of humanity, those Germans, and to think I'm actually one of them! No, that's not true, Hitler took away our nationality long ago.’’  Sarcasm used against Hitler shows a very insightful mind and one that understands the nature of the conflict that Nazism poses to basic humanity.  In another entry, one sees how Frank uses humor to highlight the inverted nature of being in the world during the Holocaust:  "The wounded seem so proud of their wounds—the more the better. One was so beside himself at the thought of shaking hands (I presume he still had one) with the Fuhrer that he could barely say a word.'' In these instances, Frank does not rage against the condition of political being that has forced her into the Annexe as much as disarms it through sarcastic humor.  Through such a display, Frank displays a wisdom beyond her years, and a keen understanding about the Holocaust.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,960 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question