Give an example of dramatic irony in Internment.

The biggest example of dramatic irony in Samira Ahmed's Internment is Jake's love for Layla. The readers recognize that Jake is falling in love with Layla early on in the book, even though Layla does not see it.

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Dramatic irony occurs when the audience recognizes something that a character does not. Samira Ahmed uses dramatic irony throughout Internment, as Layla is unaware that Jake is falling in love with her.

Jake goes beyond the scope of his job where Layla is concerned. From the beginning, he cannot...

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Dramatic irony occurs when the audience recognizes something that a character does not. Samira Ahmed uses dramatic irony throughout Internment, as Layla is unaware that Jake is falling in love with her.

Jake goes beyond the scope of his job where Layla is concerned. From the beginning, he cannot seem to say no to Layla’s requests. He is easily convinced to help her contact David and to meet him. For instance, he smuggles her a phone, despite the danger of detection, and keeps watch so she can call David.

Jake is supposed to protect the people from the Director and he vows to help free them. However, he always seems to be there specifically to rescue Layla when she is in trouble. For example, he pulls her to safety out of the chaos of the protest fast. He constantly warns her not to go too far or he won’t be able to protect her.

Although the two spend so much time together, Jake seems to be a bit awkward around Layla. One day, he hugs her to comfort her but then abruptly apologizes. The audience can sense the reason for his discomfort, even if Layla does not acknowledge it.

As the two become closer, Jake confides personal information about his life to Layla. When she asks about his tattoo, he discloses that it’s symbolic as a tribute to his mother. Additionally, when Layla talks about David and admits she feels lucky to have him, Jake tells her David is the lucky one. Jake also tells Layla that David is not the only one who worries for her. The reader understands that Jake feels very comfortable with Layla and that she is much more to him than a person he is sworn to protect.

Combined with his other actions, Jake’s biggest act to protect Layla is taking the bullet meant to kill her. He has always shielded her from the Director’s wrath, and his final act of love for her is foreshadowed. Earlier, Jake had stood between the Director and Layla to stop the Director from further beating her, unfazed by the Director’s threat of court martial. Now, after standing in solidarity with the protesters, Jake jumps in front of Layla to once again shield her from the Director’s wrath. Jake sees the Director fire the gun at Layla and he instinctively protects her, giving his own life up for her safety. He even tries to tell her he loves her before he dies, but he is unable to force out all the words.

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