Give an example of a movie or book character who thinks that their lover or friend isn't as great as they previously thought they were. For example, Daisy isn't as great as Gatsby thought she was.

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In the movie 500 Days of Summer, Joseph Gordon-Levitt's character Tom spends nearly two years pining for his ex-girlfriend Zooey Deschanel Summer, who broke up with him. Throughout the movie, which works as a series of flashbacks to the origins and then ending of the Summer-Tom relationship, it becomes...

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In the movie 500 Days of Summer, Joseph Gordon-Levitt's character Tom spends nearly two years pining for his ex-girlfriend Zooey Deschanel Summer, who broke up with him. Throughout the movie, which works as a series of flashbacks to the origins and then ending of the Summer-Tom relationship, it becomes clear that, despite Tom's insistence otherwise, that Summer is not the woman for him. He is so convinced that they are made for each other, he misreads an invitation to her party as a chance to win her back when, in reality, it was a party she was holding with her fiancé.  

Throughout the movie, Summer says that she doesn't believe in love, but she remains with Tom for several months. Their relationship looks like love to him, but it's clear in these flashbacks that she is not happy with their relationship and that it's one built on convenience, not on love. In fact, she continues to insist to himself that it is true love. 

Tom doesn't realize that Summer isn't as great as he wanted her to be, at least for him, until after this party and really doesn't get over her until he meets the aptly named Autumn at a job interview. 

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Oliver Stone's 1987 film Wall Street is one example where a character winds up learning that a friend is not as great as originally thought.

In the film, Bud Fox idolizes Gordon Gekko to the level that Gatsby valorizes Daisy. Bud sees Gekko as everything he wants to become.  He remakes himself in order to prove himself to Gekko, shedding his old personality and morality so that Gekko will accept him.  Wealth and materialism become the defining elements in Bud's pursuit.  Bud learns to measure "a man by the size of his wallet," according to his disappointed father.  His pursuit of Gekko causes him to embrace illegal means to make money so that he can be more "Gordon Gekko than Bud Fox."

The resolution of the film is that Bud learns that Gordon is not as wonderful as he originally thought.  He ends up rejecting Gekko's value system, paying a very severe price in the process. As the film concludes and Bud ends up accepting his fate, it is clear that he realizes that his "friend" was not truly a friend at all. Bud realizes that what used to "glitter" as gold is not even close to gold. Gekko's loss of luster is very similar to Daisy's in Fitzgerald's work.

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