Give an example in of alliteration in Anne Bradstreet's "To My Dear and Loving Husband."

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Alliteration in Anne Bradstreet’s poem “To My Dear and Loving Husband” (circa 1633) works in a double capacity. The first is in its use as a literary device, the examples of which are many, such as in the poem’s opener:

If ever two were one, then surely...

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Alliteration in Anne Bradstreet’s poem “To My Dear and Loving Husband” (circa 1633) works in a double capacity. The first is in its use as a literary device, the examples of which are many, such as in the poem’s opener:

If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee;
If ever wife was happy in a man,
Compare with me ye women if you can.

Note the repetition of the "w" sounds in "we," "wife," and "woman," as well as the amplified effect of the "i" sound created by the first three lines beginning with "if." The alliteration adds rhythm and music to the poem, achieving its poetic effect as a figure of speech. To take another example, consider how the "m" sound is repeated in line 5.

I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold

You can get the full effect of the alliteration’s poetic power when you say the lines out loud.

In its second capacity, the alliteration works to build the mood of the poem, which is of course love. While deceptively simple at the surface, the alliterative structure of the poem is quite complex, reminding us of the holistic truth that lies at the heart of true love. Just as the "w," "m," and "l" sounds repeat and melt into each other through the poem, so flows the poet’s love for her husband. By frequent use of alliteration, the poet is indicating unity of sound is a stand-in for the union of souls. Significantly, a lot of the important words in the poem are included in alliteration—for instance, words such as “we,” “wife,” and “women” in the first stanza and “love” and “live” in the closing lines. This points out to a poem deliberately crafted around alliteration as both form and meaning.

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The alliteration in "To My Dear and Loving Husband" is fairly subtle but shapes the meaning of the poem, which is about unity. It begins with alliteration, the repeated "w" sounds in the first two lines:

"If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were loved by wife, then thee."
This consonance, along with the repetitious structure, adds to the neatness of the couplet. There are repeated "w"s throughout the poem in such words as "wife" and "woman". The other obvious alliteration in the middle of the poem is the repeated "m" in "more than whole mines." The two are united in the final line, which includes alliteration with both letters (after the alliterative phrase "live, in love" in the penultimate line, which provides the motive for their unity):
"That when we live no more, we may live ever."
The "w"s and the "m" interlock, inseparable as the woman (w) who wrote the poem and the man (m) who is its subject.
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Alliteration is the repetition of the initial sound in successive words or words that are very close to one another in a text. We see one example of alliteration of the "w" sound in line 1 in the words were, one, and we (remember that it is the sound that is important in alliteration, not the spelling). This alliteration of the "w" sound continues in line 2 in the words were and wife. It continues in line 4 with the words with and women. This same alliteration of the "w" sound returns in the final two lines of the poem. In line 11, it begins the words while and we, and in line 12, it begins the words when, we, and we again. This extended repetition of the one particular "w" sound seems to emphasize the togetherness of Bradstreet and her husband, as it calls to mind the word "we" again and again.

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According to the "literary-terms" link, alliteration is a literary device in which the author uses the same initial sound in more than one word in (in this case) a line of poetry.  This usually means that the author is using the same letter to start the words, but sometimes it can be done with different letters which both have the same sound.

There are many examples of alliteration in this poem.  For example, in the first line, the author uses a "w" sound three times.  She uses the words "were," "one" and "we."  "One," of course, does not start with a "w," but it sounds as if it does.  Since alliteration depends on the sound and not the letter this is an example of alliteration.

One more example: in the next to the last line, the author uses "live," "love," and "let's."  All start with an "l" sound so this is alliteration as well.

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