Give a line-by-line explanation of the poem "Farewell Love and all thy Laws for ever" by Sir Thomas Wyatt.

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"Farewell Love and all thy Laws for ever" is Sir Thomas Wyatt's declaration that he will no longer allow love to dictate his actions or life.

Farewell love and all thy laws forever;Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more.

Wyatt states that he is saying goodbye to...

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"Farewell Love and all thy Laws for ever" is Sir Thomas Wyatt's declaration that he will no longer allow love to dictate his actions or life.

Farewell love and all thy laws forever;
Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more.

Wyatt states that he is saying goodbye to love and that he will no longer be trapped by it. He personifies love in order to state that he does not want to fall in love again and be "tangle[d]" in such feelings.

Senec and Plato call me from thy lore
To perfect wealth, my wit for to endeavour.

Here, he states that learning and books is what he strives to immerse himself in and that they are, to him, "perfect wealth."

In blind error when I did persever,
Thy sharp repulse, that pricketh aye so sore,
Hath taught me to set in trifles no store
And scape forth, since liberty is lever.

When Wyatt, or the speaker, did fall in love, he found that he became blind and ended up in emotional pain. This has taught him to move away from such experiences and seek freedom from the pain.

Therefore farewell; go trouble younger hearts
And in me claim no more authority.

Here, Wyatt tells the personified love that it should focus on the young, because he has had enough.

With idle youth go use thy property
And thereon spend thy many brittle darts,
For hitherto though I have lost all my time,
Me lusteth no lenger rotten boughs to climb.

Wyatt ends the poem by stating, yet again, that love is for the young because they can apparently better withstand the "many brittle darts." He believes that his time in love has been a waste and compares it to climbing a rotten tree branch that would, of course, be useless. He refuses to "lust" anymore.

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