Get A Masters In Education Online: Helpful TipsThere are many tips to consider when getting a <a href="http://www.waldenu.edu/Degree-Programs/Masters/M.S.-in-Education.htm">Masters in...

Get A Masters In Education Online: Helpful Tips

There are many tips to consider when getting a <a href="http://www.waldenu.edu/Degree-Programs/Masters/M.S.-in-Education.htm">Masters in Education</a> online. First, you need to learn more about the school offering the Master of Education degrees to ensure you will get quality Education Masters.

Asked on by haskell12

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I just finished my master's degree through my bachelor's alma-mater, but I now live away from that school, so many of the classes were taken online from it. At the end of the master's program, I had to go to the school itself, though, to defend my thesis, which seems to be a part of many if not all capstone projects. My question would be, do the online schools require you to go to their offices to defend your thesis at the end of it all? I'm sure now with Skype and other programs, it wouldn't necessarily be needed to actually go to the school to defend because one could simply organize a meeting online. I noticed, too, that online schools were so much more expensive than going through the closest university.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Other things to mindful of when pursuing a completely on-line degree is the quality of the program and is the university sponsoring the program a for profit university. Many of these programs charge exorbitant fees for the convenience of completing courses on-line. As a teacher with a masters obtained in the usual sense, I can tell you it will take years to earn back the money spent on a traditional program let alone paying off a degree from a for profit university.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I agree with you that online schools can be the same quality as traditional schools.  Usually the programs are accelerated, and I think there is definitely more work.  An accelerated class takes a semester’s worth of work and crams it into 6 weeks or so.

I would add to your advice: ask questions!  The instructor may not be in front of you, but is still there for you.

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

I am doing that very thing right now; in fact I have 2 courses in progress and then 1 more course to take in the spring semester, and my degree will be done! One tip I will give you is that it's been a lot of work! It's nice to be able to log in and work whenever and where ever I have time, but the online classes are every bit as demanding as in-person classes, and in some cases more so.

You need to be a self-starter, and you need to set aside time every day to work on your class assignments. Online classes do not lend themselves well to procrastinators.

You need to be organized. I create a folder in my laptop or each class, and then in those i create sub-folders for assignments pending, assignments complete, reference materials, etc. I also copy/paste all my discussion posts to a word document and save them, which allows me to go back and refer to them in subsequent classes.

My courses are through a traditional brick-and-mortar state university (in fact, it's the same place where I got my Bachelor's, through a standard 4 year residency program). You need to research your choices and choose a school with a good reputation; in my case, my diploma will have the name of a respected university, and no one will be able to tell whether I did the class work online or in person. In some places this is important, as some administrators have a negative attitude toward the online-only degrees, thinking they are somehow lesser quality.

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