Galaxies farther from Earth move faster and are farther apart than closer galaxies. How does this fact support the Big Bang theory? 2ND question : It has been said that fusion permits life on Earth...

Galaxies farther from Earth move faster and are farther apart than closer galaxies. How does this fact support the Big Bang theory?

2ND question : It has been said that fusion permits life on Earth to exist. Explain this statement.

3rd question: Which is older – a star made of lots of hydrogen and helium, or a star made of heavier elements?


4TH question: What does the presence of a lot of iron in a star indicate?


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Asked on by fofa123

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bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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Let us analyze this theory of the Big Bang explosion.  If all the matter of the universe were compacted together in one tight ball, then an explosion occured, the pieces on the outside would be leaving first, at a faster rate.  Those on the inside would be leaving last, probably at a slower, or more reduced rate.  And at any rate, all the galaxies would be moving away from the expenditure of energy of the explosion, from the supposed center of the explosion, and away from each other.

Fusion is the process that allows hydrogen nuclei, which is the fuel of stars like the sun, to generate the energy they produce.  The sun is the ultimate energy source for all life forms on Earth.  Two hydrogen nuclei will literally fuse together, releasing energy, and produce a helium nucleus.  This process continues until the nuclei get up around oxygen or nitrogen, where the nuclei become too heavy to undergo further fusion.

Having said all that, a star with many heavier elements would obviously be older than a star with heavy concentrations of hydrogen and helium.  Stars with the presence of much heavier elements, like iron, are likely at the end of their life cycles and will not be in existence much longer.

 

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