Sigmund Freud Questions and Answers

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In The Future of an Illusion, what is Freud's attitude towards religion?

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At one point in his long essay Freud invents a fictitious opponent who will offer some of the common counter-arguments in defense of religion.

I shall therefore imagine that I have an opponent who follows my arguments with mistrust, and here and there I shall allow him to interject some remarks.

Freud seems to have borrowed this technique from the great German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, who wrote a long essay "On Religion" in the form of a dialogue between two men he called Demopheles and Philalethes. Freud's imaginary opponent does not have a name. His most important contribution to the argument is as follows:

The doctrines of religion are not a subject one can quibble about like any other. Our civilization is built upon them, and the maintenance of human society is based on the majority of men's believing in the truth of those doctrines. If men are taught that there is no almighty and all-just God, no divine world-order and no future life, they will feel exempt from all obligation...

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