From your reading of the story "The Kitemaker," describe how the days in the past were very different from the present. Refer to the short story "The Kitemaker" by Ruskin Bond.

In "The Kitemaker" by Ruskin Bond, Mehmood the kitemaker's own decline and the decline in kite-flying parallel sweeping social changes, making the past very different from the present. The countryside has been swallowed up by urban sprawl, and the old aristocracy who were once the kitemaker's patrons are now poor and powerless.

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The old kitemaker, Mehmood, is much given to musing on how everything has changed. As soon as his grandson tells him that he has lost his kite, the old man asks whether the twine broke, since he thinks that "kite twine is not what it used to be." The kitemaker...

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The old kitemaker, Mehmood, is much given to musing on how everything has changed. As soon as his grandson tells him that he has lost his kite, the old man asks whether the twine broke, since he thinks that "kite twine is not what it used to be." The kitemaker connects his own decline with the decline in kite-flying. He used to have a shop and was once well-known for his craft. Now, there is no demand for kites. When he was a young man, kite-flying was regarded as a sport for men, who would stage elaborate battles in the air with their kites. Even the Nawab would participate, and it was for him that the kitemaker created the famous "Dragon-kite."

Alongside the changes in the kitemaker himself and in the status of kite-flying, the old man discerns sweeping social changes. He thinks of the days of his youth as "more leisurely, more spacious." There was literally more space in the grassland that had stretched from the fort to the river, an area now swallowed up by urban sprawl. The status of the old aristocracy has also declined. The descendants of the magnificent Nawab who commissioned the Dragon-kite are now almost as poor as the kitemaker himself. Without patrons, the art of kite-making, like many other arts that added color and excitement to life, is dying out.

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