From whose point of view is Doris Lessing's The Fifth Child told and what does this mean for the reader?

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Doris Lessing 's Gothic horror novel The Fifth child is told from a third-person point of view through an omniscient narrator. An omniscient narrator can relay the thoughts, motive, feelings, experiences, psychological reactions and perceptions of any or all characters, bouncing at will from one character to another if need...

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Doris Lessing's Gothic horror novel The Fifth child is told from a third-person point of view through an omniscient narrator. An omniscient narrator can relay the thoughts, motive, feelings, experiences, psychological reactions and perceptions of any or all characters, bouncing at will from one character to another if need be. The omniscient narrator also knows everything and so can give the reader information if desirous of so doing. For the reader, this point of view means that the reader also knows everything, for example, such as differences of unspoken opinions two characters may have or things that characters are both worried about while withholding their worries from the other character(s).

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