From whose point of view is "Eveline" written?

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The story is told from Eveline's point of view. It is a record of her thoughts, as well as what happens to her as she experiences the events of the story. For instance, we learn,

The man out of the last house passed on his way home; she heard his footsteps clacking along the concrete pavement and afterwards crunching on the cinder path before the new red houses. One time there used to be a field there in which they used to play every evening with other people's children.

This passage highlights Joyce's technique. Eveline watches the man in the last house passing her house on his way home. We hear what she hears: the sound of his footsteps. As she hears him walking on the path to the new houses, this leads her into a reverie about the past. We are experiencing what Eveline experiences in the moment, and we are also hearing Eveline's thoughts, rather than a detached narrator's.

The same stream-of-consciousness technique of hearing Eveline's thoughts occurs in the quote below:

Of course she had to work hard, both in the house and at business. What would they say of her in the Stores when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she was a fool, perhaps; and her place would be filled up by advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an edge on her.

We know these are Eveline's direct thoughts and not the narrator's because of the diction: the phrases "run away with a fellow" and Miss Gavan having "an edge on her" are the kind of slang Eveline would use.

Thus, we get a subjective story. We learn Eveline's take on things—both what she observes and what she thinks—but there is never a time that Joyce pulls back and provide a narrative voice that "normalizes" the story or tells us what to think. This makes this story a classic example of modernism, which tries to capture the fragmented subjectivity of human existence. We typically don't have anyone to interpret our—or other people's—lives for us.

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The story features a limited third person narrative, which means that it is told from the perspective of a storyteller whose perceptions are limited to only what he or she knows about a character or characters. In this instance, the narrator tells us about what Eveline does, thinks and feels. This account, though, relates only to her. The narrator does not say much about the other characters, and does not divulge their thoughts or feelings. As far as these characters are concerned, the teller reports only what is observed.

For example, the narrator informs us that:

She sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue. Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her nostrils was the odour of dusty cretonne. She was tired.

We are also told that:

She looked round the room, reviewing all its familiar objects which she had dusted once a week for so many years, wondering where on earth all the dust came from. Perhaps she would never see again those familiar objects from which she had never dreamed of being divided. 

The two extracts illustrate the fact that the narrator not only reports on Eveline's actions but also knows her thoughts and feelings. The narrator also presents Eveline's observations and thus relates her perspective to the reader, as in the following extracts:

What would they say of her in the Stores when they found out that she had run away with a fellow? Say she was a fool, perhaps; and her place would be filled up by advertisement. Miss Gavan would be glad. She had always had an edge on her, especially whenever there were people listening.

How well she remembered the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the main road where she used to visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He was standing at the gate, his peaked cap pushed back on his head and his hair tumbled forward over a face of bronze. 

Unlike an omniscient third person narrator, the storyteller does not share other characters' thoughts and feelings with the reader and merely reports on what is observed, as in the following example:

He rushed beyond the barrier and called to her to follow. He was shouted at to go on but he still called to her. 

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"Eveline" is writien from a third person point of view.

"SHE sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue. Her head was leaned against the window curtains and in her nostrils was the odour of dusty cretonne. She was tired." The story is told from the point of view of an unknown narrator.

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The story is told from Eveline's point of view. However, it isn't a straightforward relating of events; we are inside her head, reading her thoughts. Eveline's story is told by the battle of her conscience, the struggle over whether she can abandon her abusive father for a new life. The story takes shape through her conflicting emotions, fears and desires as well as her impressions of the people around her.

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