From what point of view is the story of The Chrysalids told; that is, who tells the story?

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The Chrysalids is told from the point of view of David Strorm, who is both the hero and the first-person narrator. It thus relates what he sees and learns from the age of about eight or nine until he makes his flight from Waknuk some time in his teens. The...

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The Chrysalids is told from the point of view of David Strorm, who is both the hero and the first-person narrator. It thus relates what he sees and learns from the age of about eight or nine until he makes his flight from Waknuk some time in his teens. The first-person viewpoint shapes the story to some extent; for instance, it may be responsible for the extremely positive picture of Rosalind, David’s love interest. On the other hand, the fact that his father, Joseph Strorm, is the chief villain of the piece gives David’s narrative position unique access to facts and opinions about all sides of the community.

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