From what point of view is To Kill a Mockingbird written?

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is told from the point of view of Scout, an adult who narrates in retrospect during the time of the narrative.

This interesting mix of adult and child in Scout as narrator contributes greatly to the narrative as a bildungsroman,  or a...

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is told from the point of view of Scout, an adult who narrates in retrospect during the time of the narrative.

This interesting mix of adult and child in Scout as narrator contributes greatly to the narrative as a bildungsroman, or a novel of maturation. While the ingenuous Scout describes the events of the story in such a manner that the reader receives a non-judgmental commentary and can follow the maturation of the main character, the adult Scout can insert herself into the narrative when needed for explanation. 

Such an occasion for this injection of the adult perspective occurs when Scout first attends school and her teacher Miss Caroline seems different from other teachers. The adult Scout inserts herself into the narrative, explaining that Miss Caroline is from Winston County in northern Alabama, a county to this day that is viewed with negativity by many residents of Alabama because it was disloyal to the state during the Civil War by being sympathetic to the North. Scout even adds commentary on how this county is more like a Northern state:

North Alabama was full of Liquor Interests, Big Mules, steel companies, Republicans, professors, and other persons of no background. (Ch. 2)

The use of Scout-the-child and Scout-the-adult as narrator enriches the narrative of To Kill a Mockingbird, making the novel appealing to both young and old.

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Harper Lee chose to narrate To Kill a Mockingbird through the eyes of Scout Finch, the youngest character in the novel. It is written in first-person, but the unusual aspect of it is that the novel is told from both the youthful child's point-of-view as well as from her mature, adult perspective. This idea was initially scorned by some critics when the novel was first released; some apparently did not understand that the "adult prose" came from a future viewpoint. Lee's decision has since been reconsidered as highly innovative.  

Nick Aaron Ford asserted in PHYLON that Scout's narration "gives the most vivid, realistic, and delightful experiences of child's world ever presented by an American novelist, with the possible exception of Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn."

It also allows Scout to use her adult hindsight to explore many of the more serious themes of the novel, giving them a more astute view than a six year old could have managed.

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is told from the first-person perspective of Jean Louise "Scout" Finch. Scout is the precocious daughter of Atticus Finch; even as a young girl, she rejects the "feminine" attributes that her small Southern town of Maycomb attempts to push on her, much preferring to embrace her tomboyishness and to keep the company of her older brother Jem and neighborhood friend Charles Baker "Dill" Harris.

Although Scout begins the novel with an inherent sense of trust in the goodness of mankind and in the people of Maycomb, she finds her beliefs challenged by the evils that she witnesses--namely the unfair and racist prosecution of Tom Robinson. This event proves to be critical in shaping the growth of Scout as a narrator and her conscience as a girl finding her way into adulthood. 

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To Kill a Mockingbird is written in the first person, from the point of view of Jean Louise ("Scout") Finch. Scout writes as an adult, remembering her experiences when she was a young girl. To Kill a Mockingbird is many things, but it is above all a narrative of Scout's youth. Scout is highly perceptive and attuned to human nature (both as a narrator and in the way she describes herself as a girl). She has a dry wit that borders on cynicism, and she is very hot-tempered. By using the voice of an articulate woman, and portraying events through the eyes of a very precocious young girl, Harper Lee is able to call attention to many of the oddities of small-town life in the South. Especially powerful is her struggle to understand the malignant forces of racism that color almost every facet of life in Maycomb, and her evolving understanding of Boo Radley. These children, very bright but innocent to the sociocultural forces that undergirded the Jim Crow South, found racism absurd. So the decision to tell the story through Scout's eyes shapes every aspect of the story.

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To Kill a Mockingbird is told in first personfrom Scout Finch's point of view.  When chapter 1 opens the novel, Scout is speaking from an adult perspective as she remembers back to past events from one momentous year in her and Jem's childhood.  She provides us with a few details of foreshadowing such as the fact that Jem broke his arm, but we don't learn much more about the heart of the story at this point.  What is interesting about the narration of this novel is that Scout is an adult telling the story as she remembers understanding it from a child's perspective. As readers, we can hear both voices in various places throughout the novel. This duality can be tricky.  The reader is left, at times, wondering "Is that what Scout understood as a seven-year-old, or is that what she understands now? Is there a blend between the youthful naivete of young Scout with the adult she came to be because of the experiences she had that year?"  As we read the novel we have to accept that Scout is very smart and insightful young lady whose experiences through school, the trial, and the attack by Bob Ewell all shaped her and left her with the story that shares.

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