From the novel "The Prisoner Of Zenda," who do you think is the hero?

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Rudolf Rassendyl is the hero of The Prisoner of Zenda. Firstly, he is the protagonist , the character with whom the reader can most identify and whose actions drive much of the plot. He is also very inch the traditional hero in his dedication to doing the right thing,...

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Rudolf Rassendyl is the hero of The Prisoner of Zenda. Firstly, he is the protagonist, the character with whom the reader can most identify and whose actions drive much of the plot. He is also very inch the traditional hero in his dedication to doing the right thing, even at the cost of his own happiness.

Rudolf is tempted by the power he assumes when posing as the true heir to the throne. Compared to the real thing, he is a nobler, smarter, and more dedicated person. Rudolf also loves Flavia, the king's betrothed, and she loves him back, far more than she does her frivolous spouse.

However, Rudolf puts duty and honor above everything else in his life. He is not willing to live a lie and take power that does not belong to him by birthright, so he gives up the throne and his beloved. These qualities are what make him the novel's true hero.

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Rudolf Rassendyll, the protagonist, is a true hero because he does not only defend his own interests but also that of a noble cause. When he is mistaken to be the king, he temporarily assumes this identity not for personal gain but to prevent a treacherous villain from otherwise taking the king's rightful place. He fulfills this role at times even better than the king himself, even in his marriage to the queen. For once the "counterfeit" is better than the real thing! 

In the end Rassendyll relinquishes the privileges he has momentarily enjoyed and resumes his original identity. Not without remorse; for him honour is truly bittersweet.

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