From Beowulf, give two examples of kennings and two examples of alliteration. Provide the line numbers.

From Beowulf, give two examples of kennings and two examples of alliteration. Provide the line numbers.

Two examples of kennings from Beowulf are "whale-road" in line 10 and "sea-wood" in line 208, and two examples of alliteration are "Then as dawn brightened and the day broke" in line 126 and "the storied leader, sat stricken and helpless" in line 130.

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A kenning is a distinctive feature of Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry. Essentially, it is a type of metaphor, but particularly it is a compound expression which would have a generally understood meaning within the cultural context in which the original poet was composing. A very well known example of an Anglo-Saxon kenning is "hronrade," or "whale-road." This kenning appears in line 10 of the Beowulf poem and is a metaphorical expression meaning "the sea." Another good example in the early part of the poem is "sundwudu," or "sea-wood," in line 208. This is a metaphorical expression commonly used in Anglo-Saxon poetry to refer to ships or other water-faring vessels—literally, wood that is meant for the sea. Cultural understanding is necessary to know that a ship is meant, rather than simply flotsam and jetsam or driftwood.

Anglo-Saxon poetry also uses alliteration —repetition of the same first letter at the beginning of words placed close to each other—throughout. Because the poetry does...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 836 words.)

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