What visual techniques are used in Freedom Writers?In the movie Freedom Writers, we see that Erin Gruwell takes the kids to the Holocaust museum. What visual techniques has there been used to show...

What visual techniques are used in Freedom Writers?

In the movie Freedom Writers, we see that Erin Gruwell takes the kids to the Holocaust museum. What visual techniques has there been used to show that these kids are realizing and want to make a change? What is the affect of the technique? Please relate it to the theme "making change".

 

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Asked on by steven94

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I am not sure if you are referring to Gruwell's technique or if you are referring to the actions of the cameras to create visual effect for the audience. Reading the way this is written, I believe it's the former.

Gruwell takes the kids to to Holocaust museum and the kids experience some sights they haven't seen for another group of individuals. The majority of them being hispanic or black, they feel that they are treated poorly on a regular basis because of their ethnic backgrounds. As they enter the museum, they are given a card that represents the life of a person, many of them children. As they wander throughout the museum, they learn about this person at different kiosks. They saw video footage and evidence of internment camps. I think the most visual technique that affected the kids was to see the eldery folks id numbers tatooed into their bodies as they ate dinner with them. The personal experience hearing the stories of what these white people went through dramatically neutralized these tough gang-affiliated teens.

To see these folks still alive and recovered from their tragedy encourages the kids to make great change. I saw that segment as one which gave them hope and the idea that if other peoples could struggle as the Jews did during the Holocaust, then they could struggle and come out stronger too. Prior to this experience, they generally all thought they would die by 30 because their lives were hopeless and full of certain death.

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