Frankenstein Questions and Answers
by Mary Shelley

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Is the Frankenstein creature more like Adam or Satan? Frankenstein's creature wonders whether he is more like Adam or like Satan ( Vol. 2, chap. 7). Which figure suits him better?

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D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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This is an interesting question, as Frankenstein's monster is arguably a more complex character than either Satan or Adam, but I too would side with Adam. Let's work through the argument.

In Volume II, the monster recounts how he helped a kind family of cottagers who had not seen him. He is exposed to books, including Milton's Paradise Lost and Plutarch's Lives. When he reads about the lives of great men in Plutarch, the monster shows sensitivity to good and evil:

I felt the greatest ardour for virtue rise within me, and abhorrence for vice, as far as I understood the signification of those terms, relative as they were, as I applied them, to pleasure and pain alone.

When he reads Paradise Lost, he is deeply moved, but relates more to Satan than to Adam:

Like Adam, I was apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect. He had come forth from the hands of God a perfect creature, happy and prosperous, guarded...

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mkcapen1 | Student

Frankenstein's creature is more like Adam.  He was created and brought to life formed in his creator’s image (idea) with a few adjustments such as being 8 feet tall.  He comes into the world an innocent being waiting to have a connection with his "father/creator."

While the creature may engage in anger and murder, he falls from grace because he has never had grace for himself.  Adam fell from the grace of God.  The creature at first breath fell from the grace of Frankenstein.

The creature wants acceptance from his father and seeks it.  He is lonely and seeks a mate.