In Frankenstein, what is the significance of Victor's and the monster's final words?The "last words" are supposed to carry special dramatic, philosophical, spiritual and moral significance for...

In Frankenstein, what is the significance of Victor's and the monster's final words?

The "last words" are supposed to carry special dramatic, philosophical, spiritual and moral significance for readers, because they give us a last impression of how each character concludes his part in the novel, explain this.

Asked on by richyhan

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herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Victor's final words represent his self-condemnation and in a way repentance not of creating the monster, but mainly of having allowed himself to challenge nature, and for letting ambition eat away his common sense.  The creature was an effect and a consequence of his acts, but the cause of his misery (of his becoming a wretch) was his own nature.

He called himself a wretch because he had destroyed all the things that had helped him rise to the top and above his peers. He, singlehandedly, took each and every one of the most important things in his life and, because of what he did, they all suffered, and dissappeared. He then thinks himself a wretch not because of the creature, but because he had already a capability for self-destruction.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

In the end of the book Victor, who hastold the captain of his life reveals the truth of who he has really been.  Up until now the captain has felt sorry for Victor as he shared his woes.  However, Victor's words demonstrate to the captain that he is actually the monster for creating and abandoning the creature.  Victor has lost all feelings for people.  He only has the drive to kill the creature.

Victor says:

"But it is true, I am the wretch."(203)

After Victor dies the creature comes into his room.  To him Victor was his creator and father.  He tells the captain of his misery in life and his desire to be accepted.  The captain realizes that the creature was very humane despite what Victor had told him.  The creature had been a victim abandoned in a world that could not accept him.

The roles of who is bad and who is good in the novel have switched.  The reader no longer feels for Victor, but for the creature.  Victor was the one in the wrong and his decision to create a life and then abandon it without consideration of the life was his own moral downfall.  He had also allowed Justine to die for a crime she had not done.

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