In Frankenstein, what are the interesting points that make you like the character of Frankenstein?I have a project about the outstanding figure. I think Frankenstein is interesting, but I don't...

In Frankenstein, what are the interesting points that make you like the character of Frankenstein?

I have a project about the outstanding figure. I think Frankenstein is interesting, but I don't know what I should mention.

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scarletpimpernel eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Victor Frankenstein is interesting in several ways. He has an insatiable quest for knowledge, and that is admirable. Even as a young boy, he is a prolific reader and is unafraid of challenging himself. Victor is all tenacious.  When his father tries to discourage him from being interested in metaphysical writers, and when Professor Krempe criticizes some of Victor's former interests, Victor becomes determined even more to continue on his quest to learn more and to make notable achievements for the human race.

In regards to "liking" Victor Frankenstein, if "like" is interpreted as admiring or sympathizing with Victor, I would think that most readers do not like him.  When my junior high school students read Frankenstein, they find Victor's character whiny, melodramatic, and extremely selfish.  They point out that almost every time that Victor faces a true challenge as a young man, he falls into a fever or becomes physically ill. What I find particularly disturbing about Victor is that he never truly takes responsibility for his creation of the monster and does not try to understand the monster.  He shows a brief moment of compassion for his creation when the monster tells him about his time near the DeLacey cottage, but otherwise, he views his creation as a blight and wishes that he would simply go away.  Even at the novel's end, Victor is not really sorry for what his experiment because he believes that he could not have predicted that monster would act as he did.

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Frankenstein

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