Do Victor and the monster become more similar as the novel Frankenstein goes on?

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Yes, Victor and the creature become more and more alike as time goes on. The two are locked in combat. Each destroys what the other one most loves and/or desires. For example, Victor agrees to create a female mate for the creature, then rips her apart. He is unable to...

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Yes, Victor and the creature become more and more alike as time goes on. The two are locked in combat. Each destroys what the other one most loves and/or desires. For example, Victor agrees to create a female mate for the creature, then rips her apart. He is unable to put the creature's desire for love and companionship ahead of his own revulsion at the idea of bringing a second monster to life. He also can't overcome his fear that the two will beget a race of monsters.

Likewise, the monster, deeply hurt by Victor's rejection and lack of empathy for him, destroys the people Victor most loves. He can't put Victor's or the victims's needs ahead of his own.

The two mirror each other in the intensity of the emotions they experience. They both become increasingly obsessed with the other, each seemingly fixated on the game of pursuit.

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Perhaps in one or two ways they become somewhat similar, but I think they diverge more than they converge in the end. Victor soon begins to suffer as he has made his creature suffer all along. After the creature kills Elizabeth, Victor says, "'A fiend had snatched from me every hope of future happiness: no creature had ever been so miserable as I was [...].'" He's completely oblivious, it seems, to the fact that he is now almost precisely as miserable as his own creature (who has been this alone and miserable for a long time now). However, while Victor becomes more unhappy, his creature has now actually acquired the companionship he sought for so long. He says, "I am satisfied: miserable wretch! you have determined to live, and I am satisfied." He even leaves clues or food so that Victor will continue to chase after him. Finally, the creature is not alone, and with the death of his own father, Victor essentially is. It seems to make the creature happy that he has rendered Victor as miserable as he has been.

In the end, Victor tells Captain Walton, "[...] I have been occupied in examining my past conduct: nor do I find it blamable.'" He takes no responsibility for the lives lost as a result of his experiment and thoughtless, selfish creation. However, the creature claims, "[...] it is true that I am a wretch. I have murdered the lovely and the helpless; I have strangled the innocent as they slept, and grasped to death his throat who never injured me or any other living thing." The creature does take responsibility for his selfish actions; he just wanted to get back at Victor so badly that he killed innocent people. He takes responsibility for his actions, while his maker never does.

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Absolutely! As Victor self-alienates himself because of his fear of the creature/monster he creates coupled with his guilt for having abandoned him, he becomes just as much a social outcast as the monster, who is shunned by all due to his hideous appearance.  In addition, the creature feels he is justified for his wrong-goings in the same way that Victor feels justified in denying blame for the actions of the creature.  Being the creature's father, Victor has a duty to accept and protect him; by neglecting this responsiblity, he indirectly causes the murders and may be looked at as a murderer himself.  The creature, regardless of how "wronged" he has been does not have the right to murder.  They almost become one and the same, at least psychologically.

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