For the following quotations, give an explication of the lines, focusing on the ways in which the lines targeted the Elizabethan audience. Quotation 1 How all occasions do inform against me And spur my dull revenge! What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and godlike reason To fust in us unus’d. Quotation 2 A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm.   Quotation 3 Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the event,– A thought which, quarter’d, hath but one part wisdom And ever three parts coward,–I do not know Why yet I live to say ’This thing’s to do;’ Sith I have cause, and will, and strength, and means To do’t.  

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Editors are only permitted to answer one question at a time.  You have asked multiple questions. 

Since I like your second quote, I will answer only that one.

In this very pithy statement, Hamlet sums up the life cycle.  We are food for worms and worms become food for fish...

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Editors are only permitted to answer one question at a time.  You have asked multiple questions. 

Since I like your second quote, I will answer only that one.

In this very pithy statement, Hamlet sums up the life cycle.  We are food for worms and worms become food for fish which humans eat.  Basically the worm that feeds upon a king could also be the worm used by any man to catch his dinner. 

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