Did religious poems and love poems achieve their intended goals in the Renaissance? How effective were these poems in affecting the society?Focusing on the era of the Renaissance. Did religious...

Did religious poems and love poems achieve their intended goals in the Renaissance? How effective were these poems in affecting the society?

Focusing on the era of the Renaissance. Did religious poems and love poems achieve their intended goal? i.e. how effective were these poems in affecting the society?

If at all possible, use evidence from poetry and or prose from the Renaissance to support answers. Thanks in advance.

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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This is a rather complicated question, as different poets had different goals, and even a single poet in writing a single poem may have had multiple goals.

Many Renaissance love poems were attempts at seduction. Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Marlowe’s "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" both are attempts to persuade the beloved that since life is short, they should yield to their lovers. As to whether the poets “scored” after writing the poems, and whether such a result would have been the outcome of the poem alone or other factors, is unknown. Secondarily, such poems were often intended to impress patrons or build reputation in the court, and many were successful.

For religious poems, many were simply personal expressions of faith or attempts to grapple with spiritual issues. Some may have been intended to arouse feelings of piety in their audiences, but emotional effect is hard to document. Some may have contributed towards their authors preferment in the church. In the case of Milton, his pamphlets had more effects on politics than his poetry, but his reputation as a poet may have given his pamphlets credibility,

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