What are two instances of flashbacks or foreshadowing in "The Pit and the Pendulum," and what helped you determine your choices?

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In his dark dungeon, the narrator returns to consciousness and recalls how he got to be in this place. He describes

[...] a full memory of the trial, of the judges, of the sable draperies, of the sentence, of the sickness, of the swoon. Then entire forgetfulness of all that...

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In his dark dungeon, the narrator returns to consciousness and recalls how he got to be in this place. He describes

[...] a full memory of the trial, of the judges, of the sable draperies, of the sentence, of the sickness, of the swoon. Then entire forgetfulness of all that followed; of all that a later day and much earnestness of endeavor have enabled me vaguely to recall.

Up until now, he has not even opened his eyes; he has only barely attempted to actually move his body. He has gaps in his memories, or flashbacks, and this eventually helps him to conclude that he is being drugged. These gaps also make him a somewhat unreliable narrator because he simply does not recall some of what has happened to him.

The narrator's moment of "joy—of hope" even while underneath the swinging pendulum seems to foreshadow his eventual escape. He describes "hope—the hope that triumphs on the rack—that whispers to the death-condemned even in the dungeons of the Inquisition." This moment gives us hope, just as the narrator is comforted by it. Even in the worst of moments, of course, we can have hope.

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In the first paragraph of "The Pit and the Pendulum," Poe foreshadows the coming fate of the narrator symbolically, when, after looking at the candles and imagining them as angels who might save him, the narrator's mind switches, and has this dark and fearful premonition:

"...the tall candles sank into nothingness; their flames went out utterly; the blackness of darkness supervened; all sensations appeared swallowed up in a mad rushing descent as of the soul into Hades."

In the next scene, the narrator is in a black room, as he imagined. Lying there in "a swoon," a half-dream where he, the narrator, tries to piece whatever he can together, he has the following flashback:

"...These shadows of memory tell, indistinctly, of tall figures that lifted and bore me in silence down—down—still down—till a hideous dizziness oppressed me at the mere idea of the interminableness of the descent."

It is indeed a descent which finds the narrator in a very real hell, where soon the swaying pendulum appears, designed to cut him in two.

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