In Flannery O'Connor's "Good Country People," what is the tone of the piece?

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The tone of the story is ironic and mocking. As she often does, O'Connor simply gets inside the head of her main character or characters and conveys their thoughts in a deadpan, mocking, scathing way. For example, she mocks Mrs. Hopewell's mortifyingly condescending and self-satisfied attitude about her own superiority in the following sentence. O'Connor simply lets Mrs. Hopewell hang herself by relaying her smug thoughts without comment:

Mrs. Hopewell liked to tell people that Glynese and Carramae were two of the finest girls she knew and that Mrs. Freeman was a lady and that she was never ashamed to take her anywhere or introduce her to anybody they might meet.

A reader might want to squirm and blush at the thoughts Mrs. Hopewell is proud to tell people about and at her unthinking assumption of the right to pass judgment on and be the "superior" social conduit for the Freeman family, but O'Connor's deadpan tone never blinks.

As we can see,...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 499 words.)

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