In the first paragraph, Vonnegut uses the words "unceasing vigilance." What does these words mean? What implications do they have in the text?

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In the first paragraph, Vonnegut writes that the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, along with the "unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General," have transformed America into a society where every individual is literally equal in all facets of life. The definition of "unceasing vigilance" means to continuously stay alert and attentive at all times, which describes the Handicapper General's work ethic and dedication to her job. Essentially, Diana Moon Glampers and her agents diligently watch the population to ensure that every citizen is obeying the law and not attempting to remove their handicaps. In Vonnegut's short story, the citizens of the United States are under constant surveillance, and Diana Moon Glampers illustrates her "unceasing vigilance" by arresting an extremely talented fourteen-year-old boy and killing him without hesitation when he escapes from prison. The Handicapper General's "unceasing vigilance" results in Harrison Bergeron's death and the subjugation of talented American citizens.

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In Harrison Bergeron, the phrase "unceasing vigilance" describes the work ethic of the Handicapper General agents. The word "unceasing" means "constant," and "vigilance" refers to careful watchfulness, so the phrase is meant to suggest that the agents of the Handicapper General are always keeping track of the handicaps placed upon people. It implies that the society of Harrison Bergeron is a totalitarian surveillance state in which citizens are constantly watched by their government to ensure that they are always handicapped. This vigilance is confirmed at the end of the story, when Harrison's brief rebellion against his government results very quickly in his death. Harrison only has time to remove his handicaps, and those of the ballerina he declares his Empress, and dance briefly with her before the Handicapper General herself, Dianna Moon Glampers, appears and shoots both of them. The vigilance of her workers ensures that Harrison's rebellion only lasted minutes, and that his actions are met with immediate capital punishment.

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