In Book 1 discuss the role of Lucie's affections in helping her father remember his past and how does this define Lucie as a character?A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

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When Lucie Manette approaches her father upon first seeing him after so many years, she approaches him without fear.  Manette looks up at her with fear; after a while his lips begin to move as he says, "What is this?"  When she touches his arm, "A strange thrill struck him,"  for there is an instinctive recognition that he does not yet understand.  When Lucie throws back her golden hair, Manette's eye catches it.  He advances his hand

little by little, he took it up, and looked at it.  In the midst of the action he went astray, and with another deep sigh, fell to work at his shoemaking.

But, Lucie lays her hand upon his arm; Manette looks at it three times,

as if to be sure that it was really there, he laid down his work, put his hand to his neck, and took off a blackened string with a scrap of folded rag attached to it.

From this, Manette pulls a couple of hairs of the same color.  He exclaims, "It is the same!  How can it be!"  Then, he makes the connection between his wife and the golden hair of his daughter.  He recalls how his wife had laid her head upon his shoulder.  He asks Lucie, "What is your name, my gentle angel?"  Lucie merely tells him to kiss her:

His cold white head mingled with her radiant hair, which warmed and lighted it as though it were the light of Freedom shining on him.

Lucie, then, becomes the golden thread that holds Manette to reality; she is the golden thread that mends the heart of Sydney Carton, she is the golden thread that lights the life of Carton and Charles Darnay.

 

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A Tale of Two Cities

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