In "The Open Boat," what are two instances of dramatic irony in which the characters' perceptions don't match the reality of the situation?

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Because Stephen Crane writes "The Open Boat" from a third-person omniscient point of view, he occasionally offers a narrative perspective that is outside the point of view of the story's characters. These instances function as dramatic irony because the author is letting the reader in on information that the characters don't have. Interestingly, Crane uses only a few of these narrator's intrusions. Most of the story provides the thoughts and dialogue of the characters.

One example of dramatic irony occurs at the end of section II. Crane lets readers know that the boat is making progress. Previously in the story, the passengers of the boat had been able to gauge their progress by their position compared to a clump of brown seaweed. Crane writes, "The little boat . . . made progress that in the absence of sea-weed was not apparent to those in her."

In section III, the passengers discuss whether there is a life-saving station in the vicinity or whether it has been abandoned. In section IV,...

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